Spring Fund Drive: March 30 - April 4
12:26 am
Thu March 31, 2011

Our shortest Spring Fund Drive ever: Today is Jazz Alley Day!

All day your $60 pledge (or greater) earns you a 2-for-1 coupon at Jazz Alley in Seattle!

You don’t even have to give $60 all at once. Become a Sustaining Member and break that down to only $5/month and a hassle free membership to KPLU!

Click here to make your gift and receive the 2-for-1 coupon!

Click here or call 1-800-NPR-KPLU to make your gift receive the 2-for-1 coupon!

Many of our Studio Sessions feature musicians who have shows at Jazz Alley, so be sure to check out some of our recent performances!

We really appreciate your support! Here are some fun extras to get you in the giving mood this spring:

Alec Baldwin doesn't want you to pledge ... or does he?  -  VIDEO: Public Radio Rap  -  Jake Shimabukuro live at KPLU

 

Food
5:24 pm
Wed March 30, 2011

NW milk still safe according to federal health officials

Dairy industries fear radiaion getting into their products. Milk is the least to worry about when it comes to being exposed to radiation.
KPLU

Northwest milk industry leaders are hustling to allay fears about radiation in their products. The Environmental Protection Agency found small amounts of radiation in a milk sample taken from a Spokane-area dairy last week.

The agency has stepped up its monitoring program earthquake and nuclear plant disasters in Japan. Blair Thompson is the spokesman for the Washington Dairy Products Commission. He says Northwest dairies are concerned about the findings, but there is no immediate risk to residents.

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Elders and aging
5:10 pm
Wed March 30, 2011

Avoiding poverty as you age

Enjoy retirement, if you can, at Safeco Field
Matt McGee Flickr

How much income will you need to be financially secure after age 65?  It’s often hard to know. A new study shows what it costs for the elderly in Washington to live at home and stay out of debt.  

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Economics and recovery
2:15 pm
Wed March 30, 2011

Housing prices falling around the nation, including the Seattle area

A sign advertises a new price on a home for sale in Seattle's Queen Anne neighborhood, Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2009.
Ted S. Warren AP

A "...boatload of loans, sitting in foreclosure," or on the verge of being taken back by the banks. Those are the words of one economist, talking about what's happening in the real estate markets of major cities, nation-wide. The greater Seattle area is no exception.

The numbers come from the Case-Schiller index and they're not pretty.

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Northwest Cultures
1:35 pm
Wed March 30, 2011

Radiation and climate change drive Marshall Islanders to Northwest enclave

Most schools are used to working with children whose native language isn't English. In most of the Northwest and the nation, that means Spanish.

But in Spokane, immigrants from a remote set of South Pacific islands have sent schools scrambling to find translators for a language most of us have never heard of. It's called Marshallese. Turns out,  people from the Marshall Islands are leaving their tropical home for the Northwest in large numbers.

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KPLU Studio Sessions
7:35 am
Wed March 30, 2011

Jake Shimabukuro: Defying genres to bring the ukulele mainland and mainstream

KPLU was pleased to welcome ukulele virtuoso, Jake Shimabukuro, into our studios on March 29, 2011. Jake played before not only a record number of KPLU Leadership Circle members, but four young ukulele players from Foster High School we recently featured in an installment of Artscape, which explored the rising popularity of the ukulele in local schools.

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Food for Thought
4:33 am
Wed March 30, 2011

Wit Whiz?

What we're talkin' about.
Nancy Leson

The headlined question can be further refined -- and refined is the word -- to "Light, Tex-Mex, Salsa Con Queso, or Italia?"

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Environment
3:39 pm
Tue March 29, 2011

Organic farming down in Washington despite growing demand for organic foods

Picking organic Gala apples near Royal City.
David Granatstein Washington State University

As sales of organic foods continue to climb across the country, organic farming in Washington has decreased. That surprised some researchers for a state that's one of the country’s top producers of organic produce.

While people in the agriculture industry expect certain crops to go through challenging cycles now and then, an annual study of the state’s organic farms shows "significant" declines in the past year, according to David Granatstein. He's sustainable agriculture specialist at Washington State University.  Granatstein co-authored a new study that found decreases in the number of organic producers, acreage and farm gate sales. 

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Alaskan Way Viaduct replacement
3:06 pm
Tue March 29, 2011

Legal questions confront proposed Seattle referendum on tunnel

Seattle's Alaskan Way viaduct remains the focus of political controversy.
AP

Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes has filed a legal challenge to a citizen referendum on Seattle's proposed deep-bore waterfront tunnel.

Holmes has asked a judge to rule on whether the construction agreements between the city and the state that targeted by the referendum are “administrative actions” which can't be overturned by the vote. 

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Artscape Encore
1:53 pm
Tue March 29, 2011

Ukuleles bring the islands to Tukwila

Students playing ukuleles is a common sight at Tukwila's Foster High School. The instrument is enjoying a surge in popularity.
Jennifer Wing/KPLU

The little ukulele is having a moment in the spotlight. It has come a long way since Tiny Tim tiptoed through the tulips. 

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Puget Sound
9:05 am
Tue March 29, 2011

Pier Peer: Discovering the Creatures of the Night

Naturalists and curious youngster gather at night on a dock at Seattle's Elliott Bay Marina. They're studying the sea life drawn to an underwater light bulb.
Liam Moriarty KPLU News

What with theaters, concerts and clubs, Seattle has a pretty lively night life. But as a group of people gathers after dark at a marina on Elliot Bay, they’re looking for a completely different kind of thrill.

Read more
News Roundup
7:49 am
Tue March 29, 2011

Tuesday morning's headlines

About a third of Pierce Transit's services are headed 'back to the garage' due to budget cuts announced Monday.
Atomic Taco Flickr

Making headlines around the Northwest this morning:

  • Heavy Rains Coming Wednesday Trigger Flood Watch
  • Pierce Transit Makes Some Deep Service Cuts Permanent
  • King County Project Likely Culprit of Massive Sinkhole

 

Flood Watch Tomorrow for Western Washington

Heavy rains over the next few days have triggered a flood watch beginning tomorrow afternoon for many western Washington counties. The National Weather Service office in Seattle forecasts warmer temperatures as a very wet frontal system stalls over the region tonight and tomorrow, dumping rain and raising mountain freezing levels from 7,000 to 9,000 feet. 

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Alaskan Way Viaduct replacement
7:22 am
Tue March 29, 2011

Tunnel vote likely in Seattle, but it may not resolve anything

A conceptual drawing of the proposed deep bore tunnel slated to replace Seattle's Alaskan Way Viaduct.
WSDOT

Opponents of the tunnel proposed to replace Seattle’s aging Alaskan Way Viaduct say they’ve gathered more than enough signatures to force a public vote. But a new poll suggests that won’t settle the contentious issue. 

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Business & Finance
6:03 am
Tue March 29, 2011

Retailer Harry & David file "pre-arranged" bankruptcy but stays open

Harry & David headquarters in Medford, Oregon.
Tom Banse Northwest News Network

Gourmet food company Harry & David hopes to make a quick trip through bankruptcy reorganization. The legendary Northwest retailer filed a “pre-arranged restructuring” plan with a Delaware court.

The struggling retailer will use the bankruptcy process to shed its heavy debt load and repair its balance sheet. The century-old Medford, Oregon icon filed papers saying the majority of its bond holders have agreed to swap their debt for equity in a restructured company.

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The Digital Future
3:31 am
Tue March 29, 2011

Japan's meltdown and the future of nuclear power

Steam rises from Energy Northwest's Columbia Generating Station, Washington state's only nuclear power plant, near Richland, Wash., in this April 2003 photo.
Jackie Johnston AP

There's no end in sight to Japan's nuclear crisis. More radioactive water is leaking from Japan's crippled nuclear complex, and traces of plutonium have been detected in soil outside the plant. Tokyo Electric Power says the amount is small and isn't a danger to public health.

Our technology commentator, Strategic News Service publisher Mark Anderson, is keeping a close eye on the situation in Japan. He tells KPLU's Dave Meyer it's like watching a train wreck in slow motion, and this crisis is a major setback for the future of nuclear power.

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