Constitutional Rights
4:22 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Federal Judge In Portland Orders Changes To No-Fly List

FILE - This May 11, 2012 file photo shows Portland Imam Mohamed Sheikh Abdirahman Kariye.
Rick Bowmer AP Photo

A federal judge in Portland on Tuesday ordered the U.S. Department of Justice and the FBI to come up with new rules for the government's no-fly list. The court found travelers labeled as potential terrorists had been deprived of their constitutional rights to due process.

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Minimum Wage
3:52 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Port Of Seattle Proposes Lifting Airport Workers’ Minimum Wage To $13 By 2017

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013 file photo, 16-year veteran skycap Fred Harris prepares multiple baggage tags for a traveler at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in SeaTac, Wash.
Elaine Thompson AP Photo

The Port of Seattle Commission has introduced a plan to set a higher minimum wage for workers at Sea-Tac International Airport.

The resolution would lift the minimum wage to $11.22 per hour this coming January, then increase the wage to $13 by 2017. The port would also require employers to provide paid days off to their workers.

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Code Switch
1:10 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before

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Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has designed a map of Native American tribes showing their locations before first contact with Europeans.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 4:14 pm

Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. But centuries of forced relocation, disease and genocide have made it difficult to find where many Native American tribes once lived.

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans.

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World Cup
9:45 am
Tue June 24, 2014

World Cup Ratings Spike: How Popular Is Soccer In The U.S.?

Fans gather in Chicago's Grant Park to watch the U.S. play Portugal Sunday — a game that set a new ratings record for soccer on ESPN.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 10:42 am

Sunday's thrilling and frustrating World Cup match between the U.S. and Portugal drew an average of 24.7 million viewers, according to the Nielsen ratings company, a result that puts the game above the recent NBA finals.

The game's total U.S. viewership of 24.7 million includes ratings from both ESPN (18.2 million viewers) and the Spanish-language Univision (6.5 million); it doesn't include the 1.37 million people ESPN says streamed the game online.

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Military & Defense
9:12 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Death Of Northwest Soldier In California Puts Army Training Accidents In Spotlight

Private First Class Andrew Sass was killed in a training incident at Ft. Irwin, California.
U.S. Army

The death of a soldier based at Joint Base Lewis-McChord over the weekend highlights the danger of training for war. Private Andrew Sass was killed Saturday in an incident at the National Training Center in California.

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Environment
5:00 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Expo Showcases Wash. State Companies' Budding Clean Tech Economy

The Incycle Cup, made by Arlington-based Microgreen Polymers, is a clean tech success story many people are eager to tell. Airlines, including launch customer Alaska Air Group, say they save fuel because the cup is lighter than paper and can be recycled.
Bellamy Pailthorp

A cornerstone of Gov. Jay Inslee’s election campaign was the promise of new jobs in clean technology.

But how healthy is the sector in Washington and what’s still holding it back? Hard data on those questions is yet to come, but a visit to the state's inaugural Clean Technology Showcase provided some answers.

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Early Childhood Education
4:57 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Seattle Voters Must Choose Between Mayor's Pre-K Program, Union-Backed Childcare Plan

Kyle Stokes

Two proposals dealing with early childhood learning will appear on Seattle ballots this November, but only one can win.

That's the electoral scenario Seattle City Council members set up Monday with their vote to put a proposed preschool pilot program on the November ballot, formally asking voters to hike property taxes to join cities like Denver and Boston in funding an early childhood education program aimed at low-income families.

But voters will have to make a choice. They can approve either the pilot program or Initiative 107, a union-backed citizens' initiative that raises the minimum wage to $15 an hour for more than 4,000 childcare workers and creates a training program for early childhood educators. 

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Seattle Police
3:56 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

O'Toole Confirmed As 1st Female Chief Of Seattle Police Department

FILE - Former Boston police commissioner Kathleen O'Toole left, speaks after being introduced by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, right, as his nominee to be Seattle's new Chief of Police, Monday, May 19, 2014, in Seattle.
Ted S. Warren AP Photo

The Seattle City Council has confirmed Kathleen O’Toole as the first female chief of the Seattle Police Department.

With an 8-to-1 vote Monday, the council approved Seattle Mayor Ed Murray’s nomination. Council member Kshama Sawant cast the lone dissent vote.

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Campus Shooting
3:20 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Insanity Defense Possible In Accused SPU Shooter's Case

FILE - Shooting suspect Aaron Ybarra is led to a court hearing at a King County Jail courtroom Friday, June 6, 2014, in Seattle.
Elaine Thompson AP Photo

The man charged with killing one student and seriously wounding two others on the campus of Seattle Pacific University on June 5 has pleaded not guilty.

On Monday attorneys for Aaron Rey Ybarra, 26, filed a notice of intent to pursue a not guilty by reason of insanity defense. The move doesn't mean they will go that route, just that they may use an insanity defense.

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Government Workings
3:07 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Wash. State's Volunteer Drivers Collect Tens Of Thousands In Mileage Reimbursements

This screenshot of Washington’s Open Checkbook shows the mileage reimbursements paid to volunteer driver Lavaughn Nuner in the first nine months of the current fiscal year.

Imagine driving your personal car for work so much that your boss cuts you a $10,000 mileage reimbursement check. That’s what happened recently at Washington’s Department of Social and Health Services.

But the person who got the check isn’t an employee, and she’s not the only one who’s logging high miles and collecting large reimbursements from DSHS. So far this fiscal year, the agency has reimbursed volunteer drivers more than $300,000.

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Youth Safety
1:07 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

UW Researcher: 1 In 8 Children At Risk Of Maltreatment, Rate Higher For Minorities

Children from an after school program in Miami participate in a candlelight vigil in April commemorating National Child Abuse Prevention Month.
Wilfredo Lee AP Photo

It's the kind of case that walks into the King County Sexual Assault Resource Center maybe once a week:

Imagine a single mother, trying to hold down multiple jobs to hold her family together, turning to a neighbor for help taking care of her kids while she works. But that neighbor ends up assaulting one of her children.

And then the neighbor "gives [the child] the message, 'If you tell anybody, I won't be able to help your family anymore, you'll be taken out of your home and your mom won't believe you,'" said King County Sexual Assault Resource Center's executive director Mary Ellen Stone.

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Darrington Rodeo
11:47 am
Mon June 23, 2014

Rodeo Band-Aid: Roping, Riding Helps People Heal From Oso Landslide

Alexis Blakey, 20, of Oso, Washington says running barrels with her horse Tax helps her hit the pause button on memories of the landslide for a few brief moments.
Anna King

The Timberbowl Rodeo in the town of Darrington, Washington saw some of its largest crowds ever this past weekend. Neighbors gathered at the event to hug, shake hands and heal from the tragic Oso landslide.

Alexis Blakey knows nearly everyone in the small town that lies 74 miles northeast of Seattle. A native of nearby Oso, Washington, 20-year-old Blakey said the landslide that made her town infamous is branded on her brain. She was at these same rodeo grounds that day when she saw ambulance after ambulance headed for Oso.

“I don’t know," Blakey said. "We were all just like, 'What is going on? Is this really happening right now?'”

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Minimum Wage
5:00 am
Mon June 23, 2014

Wash. High Court To Hear Appeal In SeaTac Minimum Wage Lawsuit

Supporters of SeaTac's $15 minimum wage packed a city council meeting last year
Ashley Gross KPLU

It’s been almost six months since some transportation and hospitality workers in the city of SeaTac got a raise to $15 an hour, but ground crew workers at the airport haven’t received that raise because of a county judge’s ruling.

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Lives Reinvented
5:00 am
Mon June 23, 2014

How Project Feast Prepares Immigrants, Refugees For Jobs In The Kitchen

In an industrial kitchen in Tukwila, a kitchen timer has the attention of a group of Congolese, Ethiopian and Iraqi men and women.

The instructor asks: What does it do?

It is used to “count the wait,” says one student named Terefe Weldeyohannes. “Not weight, but wait — how long it takes to cook.”  

For the immigrants, names of common kitchen tools can seem impenetrable. Words like grater, peeler and plastic wrap prompt blank stares and head scratching. 

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Mapping the Volcano
5:00 am
Mon June 23, 2014

Researchers To Take 'CAT Scan' Of Plumbing Deep Inside Mount St. Helens' Gut

Don Ryan AP Photo

A group of Northwest scientists are sprinkling the landscape around Mount St. Helens with high-tech sensors as part of a new effort to map the volcano’s deep plumbing.

Scientists have a pretty good understanding of what’s happening right under the mountain, where a big chamber periodically fills up with magma before an eruption. Now they’re looking deeper — down dozens of miles — to the tubes and tunnels that feed that chamber.

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