wildlife protection http://kplu.org en 5 Washington critters among species group would have feds protect http://kplu.org/post/5-washington-critters-among-species-group-would-have-feds-protect <p>They&rsquo;re slimy and cold-blooded.</p><p>But conservationists say amphibians and reptiles are important indicator species &ndash; and some of the most endangered.</p><p>Five of these sensitive creatures that call Washington home are among more than 50 included in a <a href="http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/news/press_releases/2012/amphibians-and-reptiles-07-11-2012.html">petition for federal protection.</a> Thu, 12 Jul 2012 00:56:01 +0000 Bellamy Pailthorp 5572 at http://kplu.org 5 Washington critters among species group would have feds protect Mutant two-headed trout spur scrutiny of mine pollution http://kplu.org/post/mutant-two-headed-trout-spur-scrutiny-mine-pollution <p>SODA SPRINGS, Idaho - Here&rsquo;s an image you usually don&rsquo;t see without the help of Photoshop: two-headed fish. Pictures of deformed baby trout with two heads show up in a study of creeks in a remote part of southeast Idaho.</p><p>The study examined the effects of a <a href="http://water.epa.gov/drink/contaminants/basicinformation/selenium.cfm">contaminant called selenium</a>. It comes from a nearby mine owned by the agribusiness giant, J.R. Simplot. Critics say the two-headed trout have implications beyond a couple of Idaho creeks.</p> Thu, 26 Apr 2012 17:41:19 +0000 Jessica Robinson 4861 at http://kplu.org Mutant two-headed trout spur scrutiny of mine pollution 82-acres in Pierce County to be wildlife preserve http://kplu.org/post/82-acres-pierce-county-be-wildlife-preserve <p>TACOMA, Wash. &mdash; An 82-acre peninsula in Pierce County has been purchased for protection as a wildlife preserve.</p><p> Tue, 03 Jan 2012 16:25:17 +0000 The Associated Press 3577 at http://kplu.org Seattle City Light tries osprey deterrent on utility poles http://kplu.org/post/seattle-city-light-tries-osprey-deterrent-utility-poles <p>Wildlife experts think they may have finally outsmarted the osprey, at least when it comes to keeping them off of utility poles. The hawk-like birds have caused power outages and harm to themselves by nesting on high voltage power lines.</p><p>Ospreys are pretty resourceful birds. When the tall, bare trees they used to nest in disappeared from the water&rsquo;s edge, they figured out <a href="http://fresc.usgs.gov/products/fs/fs-153-02.pdf">utility poles were a close substitute</a>. Whenever humans try to stop them from using the poles, ospreys find a workaround.</p> Mon, 25 Apr 2011 15:15:22 +0000 Charla Bear 1254 at http://kplu.org Seattle City Light tries osprey deterrent on utility poles