Food history http://kplu.org en How the sweet potato crossed the Pacific before Columbus http://kplu.org/post/how-sweet-potato-crossed-pacific-columbus When it comes to spreading food around the world, Christopher Columbus and his European compatriots get most of the credit.<p>Yes, they introduced some quintessential ingredients into European and Asian cuisine. Who could imagine Italian food without the <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2011/06/28/137457850/original-globe-trotters-tomatoes-coffee-and-pepper">tomato?</a> Or Indian and Chinese dishes without the spicy kick of chili peppers?<p>But anthropologists think that a few foods made the 5,000-mile trek across the Pacific Ocean long before Columbus landed in the New World. Wed, 23 Jan 2013 17:06:48 +0000 7612 at http://kplu.org How the sweet potato crossed the Pacific before Columbus An Evolutionary Whodunit: How Did Humans Develop Lactose Tolerance? http://kplu.org/post/evolutionary-whodunit-how-are-adult-humans-able-digest-lactose Got milk? Ancient European farmers who made cheese thousands of years ago certainly had it. But at that time, they <a href="http://www.pnas.org/content/104/10/3736.abstract">lacked</a> a genetic mutation that would have allowed them to digest raw milk's dominant sugar, lactose, after childhood.<p>Today, however, 35 percent of the global population — mostly people with European ancestry — <a href="http://www.aafp.org/afp/2002/0501/p1845.html">can</a> digest lactose in adulthood without a hitch.<p>So, how did we transition from milk-a-phobics to milkaholics? Fri, 28 Dec 2012 20:59:37 +0000 7463 at http://kplu.org An Evolutionary Whodunit: How Did Humans Develop Lactose Tolerance? East Coast author defending salmon, speaking out against Alaska's Pebble Mine http://kplu.org/post/east-coast-author-defending-salmon-speaking-out-against-alaskas-pebble-mine <p>The future of food is a subject writer Paul Greenberg has explored extensively in his NYTimes bestselling book, called <a href="http://www.fourfish.org/"><em>Four Fish</em></a>. It’s also something that interests him deeply as a lifelong fisherman. He grew up in Connecticut, where he discovered this passion as a youngster.</p><p>KPLU’s Bellamy Pailthorp invited him into our studios for an interview about his last book, as well as a new one he's been researching in the Pacific Northwest. (You can hear the interview by clicking on the "Listen" icon above. )</p><p> Wed, 03 Oct 2012 12:59:00 +0000 Bellamy Pailthorp 6558 at http://kplu.org East Coast author defending salmon, speaking out against Alaska's Pebble Mine Here's a pie in your eye: A brief history of food fights http://kplu.org/post/heres-pie-your-eye-brief-history-food-fights Last week, 500 tacos appeared at the mayor's office in East Haven, Conn. But they weren't intended for a casual luncheon.<p>Instead, this truckload of tacos was meant to be a symbol of discontent. An immigration reform group <a href="http://www.wfsb.com/story/16600448/immigration-groups-sends-hundreds-of-tacos-to-east-haven-mayors-office">sent the fare</a> in protest to what they said was an insensitive comment from Mayor Joseph Maturo in reference to Latinos and tacos.<p>The Connecticut activists join a long line of protesters who've resorted to food in the name of public humiliation. Tue, 31 Jan 2012 01:04:42 +0000 Kristofor Husted 3982 at http://kplu.org Here's a pie in your eye: A brief history of food fights