paleontology http://kplu.org en First Kennewick Man, Now Naia: Seattle-Area Scientist Probes Secrets In Ancient Skeleton http://kplu.org/post/first-kennewick-man-now-naia-seattle-area-scientist-probes-secrets-ancient-skeleton <p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/149717430&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>They call her Naia. She was probably about 16, a forager living mainly on fruit in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. One day she ventured into a cave when the floor gave out. She plunged maybe 100 feet and died.</p><p>And that’s how divers would find her, some 12,000 years later, alongside saber-tooth cats and other extinct animal bones in the now-underwater cave system.</p><p>“It’s the most complete female paleoamerican skeleton, period,” said James Chatters, owner of the Bothell-based company Applied Paleoscience.</p><p> Thu, 15 May 2014 18:00:00 +0000 Gabriel Spitzer 16597 at http://kplu.org First Kennewick Man, Now Naia: Seattle-Area Scientist Probes Secrets In Ancient Skeleton Why it took more than 80 years to identify the world's oldest dinosaur http://kplu.org/post/why-it-took-more-80-years-identify-worlds-oldest-dinosaur <p></p><p>A researcher at the University of Washington says he’s identified the oldest dinosaur ever – pushing back the emergence of dinosaurs by millions of years.</p><p>The fossilized bones were discovered back in the 1930s, in Tanzania, in a major find that included a vast collection of specimens. They were gathering dust at the Natural History Museum, London, until the scientist who had custody passed away.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Longest unpublished dissertation ever?</strong></p> Wed, 05 Dec 2012 00:02:56 +0000 Keith Seinfeld 7281 at http://kplu.org Why it took more than 80 years to identify the world's oldest dinosaur