It's All Politics
9:56 pm
Sat January 21, 2012

'Dirty' Politics As Usual In South?

Originally published on Sat January 21, 2012 2:27 pm

  • 1988: The Willie Horton Ad
  • 2008: McCain's 'Bill Ayers' Anti-Obama Ad
  • Robo-Call: Newt's Baggage
  • Robo-Call: Santorum Supports Romney

South Carolinians are voting today in the GOP primary, which some pundits see as the candidates' last stand for getting the GOP nomination to run in the general election.

On weekends on All Things Considered today, host Guy Raz talked with Danielle Vinson, the chair of the political science department at Furman University in Greenville, S.C., about what is often considered "dirty" South Carolina primary politics.

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Presidential Race
9:55 pm
Sat January 21, 2012

After Gingrich 'Slam Dunk,' GOP Battle Intensifies

Gingrich supporters celebrate his win at a rally in Columbia, S.C.
Richard Ellis Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:05 am

Newt Gingrich's win in South Carolina was big enough to ensure that the Republican primary season will remain competitive for weeks to come.

But even in the immediate aftermath of the former House speaker's 12 percentage point victory over Mitt Romney, analysts were asking whether Gingrich's newfound momentum would be enough to sustain a serious challenge.

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It's All Politics
9:54 pm
Sat January 21, 2012

Herman Cain Gets 'A Colbert Bump' In South Carolina

Former GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain waves at a rally the College of Charleston on January 20, 2012. Comedian Stephen Colbert held the event with Cain, titled "Rock Me Like a Herman Cain South Cain-olina Primary Rally", as part of his pseudo-run for president of "The United States of South Carolina."
Richard Ellis Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 23, 2012 12:01 pm

Herman Cain suspended his bid for the GOP presidential nominee back in December, but that's not stopping him from picking up votes in South Carolina's primary.

Could his mini surge of one percent of the vote be thanks to a late-breaking endorsement by Comedy Central comedian Stephen Colbert?

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Simon Says
10:07 am
Sat January 21, 2012

Should the 'leap second' be abolished? Could you repeat that?

Every few years, official clocks around the world repeat a second. It's not much, but in an age of atomic clocks, it's time enough to give the matter a second thought.
Uwe Merkel iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat January 21, 2012 6:57 am

Let me take a second here.

Not very long, was it?

But a second tied up delegates to the UN's International Telecommunication Union, who postponed a decision this week on whether to abolish the extra second that's added to clocks every few years to compensate for the earth's natural doddering.

The earth slows down slightly as we spin through space. No one falls off, but earthquakes and tides routinely slow the earth by a fraction of a fraction of a second, which makes clocks minutely wrong. If not corrected, it could make a minute of difference a century.

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Scott Simon is one of America's most admired writers and broadcasters. He has reported from all fifty states, five continents, and ten wars, from El Salvador to Sarajevo to Afghanistan and Iraq. His books have chronicled character and characters, in war and peace, sports and art, tragedy and comedy.

Planet Money
7:56 pm
Fri January 20, 2012

The Friday Podcast: Katy Perry's Perfect Year

Neil Lupin Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 22, 2012 8:12 am

  • Listen to the Podcast

Katy Perry killed it on the pop charts last year. She went No.1 five times. She was the most played artist on the radio. But the record industry is so weird, it's hard to know whether this kind of success translated into huge amounts of money for her label.

How much did the label spend on Katy Perry? And how much did they make? On today's show, we try to figure it out.

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I Wonder Why ... ?
4:20 pm
Fri January 20, 2012

Mysterious demise of Tacoma, Seattle streetcars solved

Seattle cable car at Third & Yesler in 1940.
Courtesy of Seattle Municipal Archives

Today’s stylish way to get from your high-tech office to an urbane lunch date was once so old, rickety and decrepit that it was melted into scrap-metal.

The revival of streetcars in Tacoma and Seattle would be a surprise to our civic leaders from the 1930’s. But they used to be prolific throughout the Northwest. What happened? Was it a conspiracy, or just the changing tides of fashion?

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The Salt
2:18 pm
Fri January 20, 2012

Feeding The World Gets Short Shrift In Climate Change Debate

Families displaced by drought line up for food this week in Mogadishu, Somalia.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 20, 2012 1:50 pm

Food is getting elbowed out of the discussion on climate change, which could spell disaster for the 1 billion people who will be added to the world's population in the next 15 years. That's the word today from scientists wondering why food and sustainability get such short shrift when it comes to thinking about how humans will adapt to climate change.

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Presidential Race
1:49 pm
Fri January 20, 2012

Does regionalism matter anymore, y'all?

The presidential election brings out the media's obsession with regional differences. Reporters and politicians do stand-ups from cornfields in the Midwest, beaches in California, honky-tonks in Texas — and in front of this sand sculpture of the GOP candidates in Myrtle Beach, S.C., last weekend.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 20, 2012 12:22 pm

The race for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination is fixing to get, as we Southerners tongue-in-cheekly say, about as slippery as a greased pig in a hog wallow. Nasty as a old possum in a croaker sack. Murky as South Carolina swamp mud.

The Republican primary focus is shifting to the South, where folks talk and act different from the rest of the country. And where they look for different characteristics in candidates than other regions of the ...

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Linton Weeks joined NPR in the summer of 2008, as its national correspondent for Digital News. He immediately hit the campaign trail, covering the Democratic and Republican National Conventions; fact-checking the debates; and exploring the candidates, the issues and the electorate.

Weeks is originally from Tennessee, and graduated from Rhodes College in 1976. He was the founding editor of Southern Magazine in 1986. The magazine was bought — and crushed — in 1989 by Time-Warner. In 1990, he was named managing editor of The Washington Post's Sunday magazine. Four years later, he became the first director of the newspaper's website, Washingtonpost.com. From 1995 until 2008, he was a staff writer in the Style section of The Washington Post.

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