The Salt
12:53 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Sustainable sushi: See the video, but don't eat the eel

Odds are the local sushi joint's fish is less than sustainable.
Matteo De Stefano IStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 12:38 pm

Sushi seems like the perfect modern food: Light, healthful and available at seemingly every supermarket in the nation. But is it sustainable?

That's the question behind "The Story of Sushi," a new video that's been pulling a lot of clicks in the past week. Maybe that's because its adorable format, with tiny, handcrafted figures used to tell the tale, stands in stark contrast to its depressing message: Most of the sushi we snarf up is harvested using unsustainable methods.

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Humanosphere
11:41 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Changemakers: Matthew Schneider on the hunt for what truly works

Quick BIO: Matthew T. Schneider, 25, is a research consultant for the Center for Global Development in Washington, D.C. He has a master of public health degree from the University of Washington’s Department of Global Health.

This is the first installment of a new series on KPLU's Humanosphere:  “Changemakers” explores how young people, connected and globally aware, are working to change the world.

For Matthew T. Schneider, the struggle to ease the suffering of people afflicted by HIV/AIDS or sickened by malaria is something of a numbers game. Schneider, who since October has worked at the Center for Global Development in Washington, D.C., is sifting mountains of data to understand how to best help sick, impoverished people in developing nations.

Read more on Humanosphere.

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Environment
11:31 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Environmentalists push climate change suits on behalf of kids

Nelson Kanuk, a 16 year old from Kipnuk, Alaska, has a lawsuit against the state of Alaska that aims to force the state to reduce carbon emissions.
Courtesy of OurChildrensTrust.org

EUGENE, Ore. – Environmental lawyers are trying a new legal tactic, hoping to force the government to take more aggressive steps against global warming. They’re bringing lawsuits on behalf of kids – including young plaintiffs in the Northwest . The cases use a legal theory put forth by a University of Oregon professor.

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Seattle history
11:00 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Deal expected to preserve Seattle P-I globe

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer globe where it currently sits at 101 Elliott Avenue West.
The Associated Press

An agreement among Hearst Corp., the city of Seattle and the Museum of History and Industry is expected to preserve the Seattle P-I globe, an icon of the city for more than 60 years.

The fate of the 18-ton, neon-lit orb has been uncertain since the Hearst-owned Seattle Post-Intelligencer ceased printing and became seattlepi.com in 2009. The website reports that three city council members who are all former reporters — Jean Godden, Tim Burgess and Sally Clark — are expected to announce an agreement to preserve the globe on Wednesday.

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Planet Money
10:53 am
Mon March 5, 2012

NPR factoid table: How the 1 percent and the 99 percent are doing

via Emmanuel Saez

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 10:38 am

Quick update on income inequality in America.

Emmanuel Saez, an economist who's one of the leading scholars on the subject, just published some new numbers.

Saez tracks income growth since 1993. He compares the top 1 percent of earners to everybody else.

Three things to note in this table:

1. Over the long term, the top 1 percent have seen much larger gains than everyone else.

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Artscape
4:30 am
Mon March 5, 2012

'A Song For Our Planet' - Hearing the sacred in the environment

Angela Sevin Flickr

Did you know that in just about every sacred text there is a reference to the environment? From the Bible to the Koran, to ancient Buddhist writings, there are passages that talk about how people have either been destroying the Earth or how we need to do a better job taking care of it.

A new coral work performed by Seattle First Baptist and Plymouth Church focuses entirely on the environment. It's called A Song For Our Planet.

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Around the Nation
5:16 pm
Sun March 4, 2012

A Hollywood Writer's Second Act: Gongs

Comedy writer Andrew Borakove left California for Lincoln, Neb., to sell gongs.
Guy Raz

Originally published on Thu March 8, 2012 12:22 pm

There's a Mystery Machine sitting outside Andrew Borakove's nondescript warehouse on a quiet street in Lincoln, Neb.

"I can never be depressed driving around town, because there's always some 4-year-old waving to me manically," Borakove says.

The mystery about the Scooby Doo replica van starts to fade, however, once you notice the bumper stickers on the back. Black background, white font, like a "Got Milk?" ad: "Happiness Is a Warm Gong." "Gongs, Not Bongs." "My Child Is an Honor Gong Player."

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Things from space
5:10 pm
Sun March 4, 2012

Meteorite Hunter Scours The Ground For Bits Of Sky

One of Ruben Garcia's favorite spots to go meteorite hunting is an enormous dry lake bed in southern Arizona.
Courtesy Jana Becker

Originally published on Sun March 4, 2012 4:03 pm

Every so often, pieces of heaven crash into Earth.

They can come from our own solar system, or millions of light years away. Few of us are lucky enough to get our hands on one of these space rocks. But for meteorite hunters and dealers such as Ruben Garcia, touching a piece of outer space is a daily routine.

The Best Hunting Grounds

One of Garcia's favorite spots to go meteorite hunting is an enormous dry lake bed in southern Arizona.

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Three seats for congress
2:10 pm
Sun March 4, 2012

With Norm Dicks out, 3 open seats put Wash. in national spotlight

With the loss of Norm Dicks, seen here in 2010 with President Barack Obama and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., Washington state lost an important power broker.
The Associated Press

Now that U.S. Representative Norm Dicks has announced he’s retiring, western Washington will have three open seats for Congress in this fall’s election. That’s unusual, and it could mean a lot of national attention for those elections.

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