Environment
1:05 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

EPA creates Website to ID biggest emitters of greenhouse gases

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 12:39 pm

Ever wondered who the big greenhouse-gas emitters are in your neck of the woods? The answer is now just a click away.

The US Environmental Protection Agency today unveiled a new website that identifies most of the nation's biggest emitters of carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases. It lets you, for example:

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Award-winning journalist Richard Harris has reported on a wide range of topics in science, medicine and the environment since he joined NPR in 1986. In early 2014, his focus shifted from an emphasis on climate change and the environment to biomedical research.

Global Health
10:39 am
Wed January 11, 2012

A dozen cases of tuberculosis that resists all drugs found in India

An image of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria captured with an electron microscope.
CDC

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 6:55 am

Tuberculosis specialists in India have diagnosed infections in a dozen patients in Mumbai that are unfazed by the three first-choice TB drugs and all nine second-line drugs.

The doctors are calling them "totally drug-resistant TB," and the infections are essentially incurable with all available medicines.

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Environment
10:12 am
Wed January 11, 2012

Hanford whistleblower case dismissed against Bechtel

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 9:18 am

RICHLAND, Wash. – A Benton County Superior Court judge in southeast Washington has dismissed a Hanford whistleblower's case against a government contractor. That means that whistleblower, Walt Tamosaitis , will have to appeal if he wishes to keep fighting the Hanford contractor.

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The Two-Way
10:05 am
Wed January 11, 2012

Natalie Wood's Death Still Looks Like An Accident, Investigators Say

Natalie Wood in 1960.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 9:01 am

Two months after announcing they were going to take another look at the circumstances surrounding the 1981 death of actress Natalie Wood, authorities in Los Angeles are saying there's "no evidence to suggest that the cause was anything but accidental," the Los Angeles Times reports.

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The Two-Way
9:54 am
Wed January 11, 2012

Google tweaks search to boost Google+, and rivals get angry

A screengrab shows Google's new search feature, in which results from a user's Google+ community are promoted at the top of the page.
NPR

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 9:50 am

Social media has become a huge part of how people experience the web. So it's not surprising that Google's move to integrate "personal results" into its web searches — drawing from a user's Google+ profile — wasn't praised by the folks who run rival social networks.

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Food for Thought
4:30 am
Wed January 11, 2012

This will become your favorite wintertime soup

Notice that I'm using an Asian style ceramic spoon. It's the metal spoon not the soup itself that burns your mouth.
Dick Stein KPLU

 It's Zuppa di cavolo nero – Red Cabbage and Bean soup from Marcella Hazan's Classic Italian Cookbook.  Good as it looks, it tastes even better.  (Check out her recipe below).

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Budget crisis
4:51 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Wash. Supreme Court hears arguments on arena debt

OLYMPIA, Wash. — The Washington Supreme Court is considering arguments over the debt troubles surrounding Wenatchee's events arena.

Justices heard debate Tuesday about whether the area's public facilities district should be able to refinance nearly $42 million.

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Dan Savage/Santorum
4:32 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Rick Santorum's Google Problem Becomes The Story

Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum during the nation's first primary on Jan. 10, 2012 in Manchester, N.H.
T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 1:27 pm

Rick Santorum has a problem. The Republican presidential candidate has been dogged by gay rights activist Dan Savage since 2003, when as a senator he supported anti-gay laws, including against sodomy. Savage, an internationally syndicated sex advice columnist, took offense and called on his readers to wage an Internet war. He invited them to name, or re-name, a sex act after Santorum. Then he took a vote and created an anti-Santorum website with the new "definition." It's not delicate.

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Edward Schumacher-Matos is the ombudsman for NPR. His column can be found on NPR.org here.

Having spent more than three decades as a reporter and editor in the United States and abroad for some of the nation's most prestigious news outlets, and having founded his own newspapers, Schumacher-Matos has a deep understanding of the essential role that journalists play in upholding a vital democracy. He also intimately understands the demands that reporters and editors face every day.

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