Blog Of The Nation
8:56 am
Sun February 5, 2012

The 'other' thing you may not know about Facebook

Did you know Facebook had this "Other" folder?
Facebook

Originally published on Sun February 5, 2012 3:57 am

Now that Facebook has filed to go public, there's a lot of reflection on how the social media site became the mammoth it is today. The site has gone through a lot of changes in its eight years. Remember when you had to have a college email address to join? Remember when you had to type "thefacebook.com"?

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Artscape
8:55 am
Sun February 5, 2012

A mini-opera about the Everett Massacre of 1916

A "Wobbly," or member of the Industrial Workers of the World, circa 1914
Photo by Bain News Service Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

The bloodiest event in Pacific Northwest labor history, the event that left 7 people dead and many more seriously injured, is the subject of a new mini-opera by Wayne Horvitz and Robin Holcomb at Seattle's ACT Theatre.

Called "Smokestack Arias," the work tells the story of the events of Nov. 5, 1916 when two boatloads of Industrial Workers of the World -- "Wobblies" -- arrived from Seattle to Everett.

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All Songs Considered Blog
5:57 pm
Sat February 4, 2012

Bjork As Music Teacher At The New York Hall Of Science

Bjork performs during the Biophilia Live Show at the New York Hall of Science in Queens, N.Y., Feb. 3, 2012.
Julieta Cervantes

Originally published on Sat February 4, 2012 10:52 am

Bjork told a journalist recently that she'd always wanted to be a music teacher. And so she was, in her own dazzling style, during the first show of a six-night residency at the New York Hall of Science. A variation on her innovative performance at the Manchester Festival in England last summer, it presented the music from her 2011 LP Biophilia for the first time in the U.S.

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Around the Nation
5:55 pm
Sat February 4, 2012

Lost Malcolm X speech heard again 50 years later

Richard Holbrooke and Katharine Pierce as students in 1961 at Brown University.
Katharine Pierce

Originally published on Sat February 4, 2012 2:57 pm

Last semester, Brown senior Malcolm Burnley took a narrative writing course. One of the assignments was to write a fictional story based on something true — and that true event had to be found inside the university archives.

"So I went to the archives and started flipping through dusty compilations of student newspapers, and there was this old black-and-white photo of when Malcolm X came to speak," Burnley says. "There was one short article that corresponded to it, and very little else."

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Guy Raz is the host of TED Radio Hour, a co-production of NPR and TED that tackles astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems and new ways to think and create. Each radio show is based on talks given by riveting speakers on the renowned TED stage, bound together by a common theme such as the thrill of space exploration, going to extremes, the source of happiness or 'when rights goes wrong' in our justice system. Currently, he is also a Ferris professor of journalism at Princeton University where he teaches radio reporting.

University of Washington
Author Interviews
7:57 am
Sat February 4, 2012

Media 'miracle': The 'big' story of three whales in Barrow, Alaska

Big Miracle by Tom Rose

Originally published on Sat February 4, 2012 3:08 am

In October 1988, the big news was presidential politics — the race between George H.W. Bush and Michael Dukakis was in its final weeks — but a dramatic whale rescue was about to captivate the world. This story is the focus of a movie now in theaters starring Drew Barrymore and John Krasinski.

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The Picture Show
7:53 am
Sat February 4, 2012

Vintage view: 1920s Pacific Northwest in color

Mt. Saint Helens from Spirit Lake
Asahel Curtis Washington State Archives

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:03 am

When Johnson and Ellen Sheriff Curtis moved their family from Minnesota to Seattle in 1887, two of their teenage sons developed a burgeoning interest in photography.

One of them, Edward Curtis, would go on to become famous for his photographs of Native Americans. But his brother, Asahel Curtis, who worked to less acclaim as a commercial photographer in Seattle, also left behind a remarkable body of work.

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Economy
4:53 pm
Fri February 3, 2012

Economy does seems brighter to some Seattleites

The economy is looking a bit brighter to the Seattleites we talked to on Friday.
Cellular Immunity Flickr

The unemployment rate is at its lowest level in three years. The stock market is up.  But, are you feeling better about the economy? 

Maybe it was the economic news. Maybe it was the sun coming out for the first time in a while, but most people we talked to on the streets of downtown Seattle this afternoon said they were feeling positive.

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NW Craft Brews
4:04 pm
Fri February 3, 2012

The Friday beer: (Space Needle winner) Pike Brewing's Golden Anniversary IPA

Pike Brewing's Golden Anniversary IPA, served up by Pike Sales Manager, Steve Case.
Paul Gibson

This past Tuesday there was a little competition between 10 of Puget Sound's breweries to see who will brew a special 50th anniversary beer for the Space Needle.

With scorecards and tasting glasses in hand, a packed room in the famous landmark enjoyed the view, sampled beers and chose a winner.

Pike Brewing Company's "Pike Space Needle Golden Anniversary IPA" came out on top.

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Microbes among us
3:51 pm
Fri February 3, 2012

Tech innovation unveils Puget Sound's secret natural recyclers

This graphical map shows how millions of strands of DNA form a tangle of information, from bacteria, archaea, and viruses -- and helps show which ones can be grouped together.
Vaughn Iverson UW

Scientists have deciphered some of the secrets of one of Puget Sound’s natural recyclers. It’s a microbe – which likes to eat sulfur and nitrogen – and might be found near any of our beaches.  

The technique they devised could open the door to a better understanding of microbial life that abounds everywhere – in the oceans, in soils, and in the human body.

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