Books
6:28 pm
Sat January 28, 2012

'The Snowy Day': Breaking color barriers, quietly

With special permission from The Ezra Jack Keats Foundation

Originally published on Tue January 31, 2012 7:13 am

One morning many years ago, a little boy in Brooklyn named Peter woke up to an amazing sight: fresh snow.

Peter is the hero of the classic children's book by Ezra Jack Keats, The Snowy Day, which turns 50 this year. Peter has a red snowsuit, a stick just right for knocking snow off of trees, and a snowball in his pocket. And, though this is never mentioned in the text, Peter is African-American.

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Art & Design
11:40 am
Sat January 28, 2012

Pollock's legend still splattered on art world

Influenced by Mexican and Native American art, Pollock popularized action-painting and drip style, as seen in Number 7, 1951.
Pollock-Krasner Foundation, National Gallery of Art/Artists Rights Society

Originally published on Sat January 28, 2012 10:55 am

Even a century since his birth, American "splatter artist" Jackson Pollock still provokes heated debate about the very definition of art.

Was a man who placed a canvas on the floor and dripped paint straight from the can actually creating a work of art?

"It's very hard if you try to build the paint up to this extent with this many colors and not achieve mud," says National Gallery of Art curator Harry Cooper.

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Election 2012
9:41 am
Sat January 28, 2012

Why new photo ID laws mean some won't vote

Stickers at a Nevada polling place on Election Day 2010.
Max Whittaker Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 28, 2012 9:55 am

The argument over whether voters should have to present photo identification at the polls usually splits along party lines. Republicans who favor the requirement say it prevents ballot fraud. Democrats and election rights groups who oppose it say it is meant to suppress turnout.

And people of all political stripes wonder what all the fuss is about.

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The Salt
9:38 am
Sat January 28, 2012

Deception diet: How optical illusions can trick your appetite

The Delboeuf illusion makes one dot appear larger than the other. But they're the same size. Your brain is misled by comparing the dots to the surrounding circles.
Washiucho Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Sat January 28, 2012 11:12 am

Think you know how to avoid overeating? Think again.

Research suggests that choices, like how much to eat during a meal, are often made subconsciously. Trouble is, our brains are hard-wired to mislead us in lots of little ways, which can have a big impact on our diets.

Take the Delboeuf effect, an optical illusion first documented in 1865. It starts with two dots of equal size. But surround one dot with a large circle and the other dot with a small one, and suddenly the second dot looks bigger.

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NW Craft Brews
3:00 pm
Fri January 27, 2012

The Friday beer: Bear Republic Brewing’s Racer 5 IPA

The Racer 5 IPA.
Paul Gibson

All along the West Coast, from Victoria, B.C., to San Diego, Calif., you can find not just good but great beer. We are lucky. The Racer 5 India Pale Ale is another fine IPA from Northern California available locally.

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Blues Time Machine
1:00 pm
Fri January 27, 2012

'Rock Island Line' evolved from the rhythm of hard labor

library of congess

Blues evolved from many different sources including spirituals, work songs, and chants. “Rock Island Line” began as a work song, first recorded in 1934 by prisoners at Cummins Farm in Arkansas. The rhythm of physical labor is integral to songs like these.

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animal cruelty
12:59 pm
Fri January 27, 2012

That's a lot of cats - 74 in one camper

King County Animal Control authorities have seized 74 cats and 1 dog from a camper parked next to the Auburn Regional Medical Center.

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Barefoot Bandit
12:32 pm
Fri January 27, 2012

Colton Harris-Moore sentenced to 6 1/2 years in prison

A federal judge on Friday sentenced "Barefoot Bandit" Colton Harris-Moore to 6 1/2 years in prison for his infamous two-year, international crime spree of break-ins, and boat and plane thefts that ended in 2010.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:22 am
Fri January 27, 2012

Study: 1 in 14 People Has Oral HPV Infection

Originally published on Fri January 27, 2012 9:50 am

So how many people have human papillomavirus in their mouths?

Quite a few, say researchers who got more than 5,000 volunteers across the country to spit into a cup and answer detailed questions about their sex lives.

The bottom line: 6.9 percent of people in the U.S. (ages 14 to 69) have oral infections with HPV. Some types of HPV are linked to cancer and genital warts.

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The Salt
9:24 am
Fri January 27, 2012

From Health Food To Health Risk: Sprouts Slip Off The Menu

Fresh and green, yes. Clean, maybe not.
Jowita Stachowiak iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Fri January 27, 2012 9:55 am

At the rate they're going, those nutritious-looking sprouts may disappear from sandwiches and salads near you in not too long. And that may be a good thing.

This week, the Beaumont, Tex.-based Jason's Deli chain announced that it would no longer serve fresh sprouts, citing frequent recalls due to bacterial contamination.

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