Law
2:49 pm
Wed July 27, 2011

Wash. prisons fined for safety violations after officer murder

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Lapses in training and “serious” safety violations may have contributed to the murder of a Washington correctional officer earlier this year. Those are the findings of a six month investigation by Washington’s workplace safety watchdog.

The agency issued citations and fines Wednesday against the Department of Corrections.

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Fraser River salmon
12:26 pm
Wed July 27, 2011

Controversy growing in Canada over ‘muzzling’ of salmon expert

Here is a stretch of the Fraser River in Vancouver, British Columbia. Scientists working with sockeye salmon struggling to cope with warming temperatures in the Fraser River have identified broad genetic traits that can predict which fish will live or die
Associated Press

Government officials in Ottawa are getting heat for apparently muzzling a scientist whose study discovered that a viral infection – which has been referred to as "salmon leukemia" – may be the cause of salmon stocks crashing off Canada’s west coast.

The Vancouver Sun reported that the Privy Council Office, which supports the Prime Minister’s Office, stopped the study’s lead scientist “from talking about one of the most significant discoveries to come out of a federal fisheries lab in years.”

The Canadian government told the Postmedia News, which wrote the story, that scientist Kristi Miller has not been permitted to talk about her work because she is expected to testify later this summer before a commission looking into the decline of the Frazer River sockeye salmon.

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Puget Sound
11:18 am
Wed July 27, 2011

Dead gray whale calf on Bremerton beach was very emaciated

BREMERTON, Wash. – A gray whale that washed up on a Bremerton beach was alive when the stranding was reported this morning but it was dead when a National Marine Fisheries employee arrived on the site on Dyes Inlet.

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Humanosphere
10:24 am
Wed July 27, 2011

Malawi protests: An African spring?

A protester burns vegetation in a street in Lilongwe, Malawi, last week. Protesters went on the rampage after a court injunction stopped them protesting the economic and democratic crisis in the country.
Associated Press

Just as when Tunisians first rose up against their government, few outside are paying much attention.

The same basic forces — unemployment, high food prices, human rights abuses and mistrust of government — which sparked the revolt in Tunisia and then led to today’s widespread popular revolution across the Arab world, is now at play in this small, southeastern African nation.

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Food for thought
5:00 am
Wed July 27, 2011

Strategies for buttering up the kernel

Corn skewers lie down on the job.
Wikipedia commons

Two  corn cobs walk into a bar.  They notice a third, shady-looking cob trailing them. First cob turns to his friend and whispers ...

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Attacks in Norway
1:44 am
Wed July 27, 2011

Seattle vigil for victims in Norway

An overflow crowd listens to the vigil on speakers set up on the lawn of the Nordic Heritage Museum on July 27, 2011.
Paula Wissel/KPLU

The Nordic Heritage Museum in Ballard was packed last night as hundreds gathered to pray, sing and offer their condolences to the people of Norway. The Vigil of Remembrance, as it was called, was organized by the Museum, the Honorary Consul of Norway and the Pacific Lutheran University.

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Hanford Nuclear Reservation
5:42 pm
Tue July 26, 2011

Hanford cleans up underground trench waste ahead of schedule

Workers secure a box of low level waste for shipment at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.
Northwest News Network

RICHLAND, Wash. – Hanford Nuclear Reservation workers have retrieved a key portion of radioactive waste ahead of schedule. That announcement came from the federal government today.

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Fisheries study
5:33 pm
Tue July 26, 2011

Genetically modified Atlantic salmon can breed with wild fish

New study shows that genetically modified Atlantic salmon can mate with their wild counter parts.
Don Taylor Flickr

A new study of genetically-modified Atlantic salmon shows they can breed with their wild counterparts. Critics worry escaped farmed fish could weaken wild stocks.

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Environment
5:23 pm
Tue July 26, 2011

Feds revoke authority to kill sea lions

Federal officials revoked the permission today they had given to Oregon and Washington to trap and kill sea lions on the Columbia River. But Rob Manning reports it may be just a temporary move.

The Humane Society of the United States is battling the two states and the federal government in court over the propriety of killing sea lions to save salmon. Government officials say there are doubts about whether the latest federal authorization was given properly – because the states hadn't requested new authority.

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