Anna King

Richland Correspondent

Anna King, KPLU’s and N3’s Richland-based reporter, has been covering the Mid-Columbia since the spring of 2007. Before that she was a print reporter for the Tri-City Herald where she covered the environment, Native Americans, agriculture and Northwest wine. A Washington native, she's also a regular contributor to the magazine Wine Press Northwest and was a contributing author to the guide book Best Places to Kiss in the Northwest. Anna's memorable moment in public radio: "Being dusted from head-to-toe by a potato digger during harvest. Every square inch of me was covered in fine sand. Public radio is a dirty job!"

Pages

Natural Disasters
1:15 pm
Thu May 19, 2011

As Yakima River Flood Waters Recede, Residents Clean Up

Portions of Gomer Road near Richland, Wash. are closed due to water over the roadway.
Benton County Emergency Services Dept.

Some areas of the Northwest remain at risk of flooding. But residents along the Yakima River are cleaning up flood damage as the water recedes.

Read more
Wildlife reintroduction
2:45 pm
Thu May 12, 2011

Pygmy rabbits face possible last stand in the state

Fish and wildlife agents work to construct a temporary enclosure for pygmy rabbits on Sagebrush Flats Wildlife Area north of Ephrata.
Anna King N3

In north central Washington, scientists are trying once again to reintroduce a tiny endangered rabbit species into a big, predator-ridden landscape. Next week, scientists plan to release about 100 young pygmy rabbits, each one the size of a tennis ball.

Read more
ENVIRONMENT
2:12 pm
Tue April 26, 2011

Questions remain about piping Hanford's nuclear waste

One of the most difficult challenges at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation is moving radioactive waste from point “A” to point “B.” The federal government is spending billions of dollars on a waste treatment plant. Piping that radioactive waste across the desert is sort of like getting ketchup out of a bottle. But it’s a whole lot more complicated and dangerous.

Read more
Living in Gangland
4:00 am
Wed April 13, 2011

Some women don't choose gang life, but it affects them nonetheless

Anna King Northwest News Network

This week we're taking a look at what police say is a resurgence of gang activity - especially in rural areas. In part three of "Living In Gangland," we profile a mother and daughter and their struggle with gangs.

Across the nation there are an estimated 750,000 gang members. That's according to the U.S. Department of Justice. Some of them are women, but more often, women are impacted as the mothers, sisters and girlfriends of gang memgers. They may not actively choose the gang life, but its perils affect them nonetheless.

Read more
Living in Gangland
4:00 am
Tue April 12, 2011

Activist in tiny Outlook, Washington wants a town where people aren't afraid

A sign promoting a community meeting in Outlook, Wash. a dairy town near Yakima.
Anna King Northwest News Network

This week we're taking a look at what police say is a resurgence of gang activity - especially in rural areas. In part two of "Living in Gangland," we bring you the story of the unincorporated town of Outlook, in Eastern Washington - and one woman who is fighting to get the town back.

When "Maria" gets off Interstate 82 and heads down the off ramp for Outlook – she starts praying -  that she’ll get home safe today.

Read more
Public Health
2:40 am
Mon April 4, 2011

Northwest very familiar with Iodine-131

An alfalfa field near Richland, Wash., Mar. 30, 2011.
Anna King Northwest News Network

The small amounts of radioactive Iodine-131 found in milk in Spokane has been causing ripples of concern throughout the Northwest. Officials say the tiny amounts of radiation found in the milk were probably blown over from Japan’s stricken nuclear plants.

Just outside the Tri-Cities, Drex Gauntt’s alfalfa fields roll out like a plush emerald shag carpet. One of the ways that cows can pass Iodine-131 into their milk is by eating grass or hay that’s been contaminated with the radioactive isotope. Gauntt says he’s not too concerned.

Read more
Food
5:24 pm
Wed March 30, 2011

NW milk still safe according to federal health officials

Dairy industries fear radiaion getting into their products. Milk is the least to worry about when it comes to being exposed to radiation.
KPLU

Northwest milk industry leaders are hustling to allay fears about radiation in their products. The Environmental Protection Agency found small amounts of radiation in a milk sample taken from a Spokane-area dairy last week.

The agency has stepped up its monitoring program earthquake and nuclear plant disasters in Japan. Blair Thompson is the spokesman for the Washington Dairy Products Commission. He says Northwest dairies are concerned about the findings, but there is no immediate risk to residents.

Read more
Military
7:42 am
Fri March 25, 2011

Northwest airmen soldiers aiding in Libya operation

A C-17 Globemaster sits on the tarmac with Mt. Rainier in the distance at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Lakewood.
Biggunben Flickr

Some Air Force and Army bases in the Northwest are helping with the Libyan fight. Seven tankers and about 100 airmen from Fairchild Air Force Base are already working in undisclosed locations in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn.

Read more
Food
1:24 pm
Wed March 23, 2011

Walla Walla's L'Ecole Winery grows up with a new label

L’Ecole winery is debuting its new lables. They’re a bit sleeker and more gown up than the popular child’s painting of the school house used for more than 20 years.
L’Ecole

One of Washington's oldest and most recognizable wine brands, L’Ecole, is growing up a bit with a new, sleeker label.

L'Ecole is French for "the school" and that's because the winery operates out of a nearly 100-year-old school house. The old label was a child's colorful drawing of the facility. The new label sports a sepia-toned oil painting of the historical school house soon after it was constructed in 1912.

Read more
Nuclear Waste Business
3:40 am
Tue March 22, 2011

Hanford whistleblower case raises questions for Feds about worker's demotion

Documents surfacing from an ongoing lawsuit are raising questions about the demotion of a Hanford whistleblower and whether a top manager with the Department of Energy was involved.

Read more
Nuclear Waste
3:01 am
Mon March 21, 2011

Washington to argue for Yucca Mountain waste storage project

Japan's nuclear reactor crisis has sharpened the debate over where the U.S. will store its radioactive waste in the long-term. Tuesday the State of Washington and other plaintiffs will argue in federal court that the Obama administration should not abandon the Yucca Mountain repository in Nevada.

Read more
Hanford Nuclear Reservation
2:27 pm
Fri March 18, 2011

Hanford watchdog sues for more plutonium fuel documents

The nuclear reactor crisis in Japan is prompting more scrutiny of the nuclear power plant near Richland in southeast Washington. Thursday a Seattle-based Hanford watchdog sued Energy Northwest. The group is demanding the power supplier turn over more documents on the possibility of the plant using plutonium for reactor fuel.

Read more
Environment
12:07 am
Mon March 14, 2011

Snake, Columbia dams to open after long closure

The second leaf of the new The Dalles downstream navigation lock gate is lowered into position on March 5.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers will open for barge traffic soon. Locks were closed for several months during repairs.

Read more
Agriculture
7:58 am
Fri February 25, 2011

Middle East among factors causing wheat price volatility for Washington farmers

The Middle East is one of the largest wheat-importing regions in the world but the tumultuous political climate in the Middle East is creating volatility in the price of wheat.
Wikimedia Commons

The tumultuous political climate in the Middle East is creating volatility in the price of wheat.  Northwest farmers and wheat traders are trying to hedge against the uncertainty.

Read more
Nuclear Waste Clean-up
3:04 pm
Wed February 23, 2011

Federal audit: part of Hanford cleanup mishandled

The federal government mishandled the cleanup of the dangerous Hanford K-Basins near the Columbia River. The mistakes cost taxpayers millions of dollars. Those are some of the conclusions of a federal Inspector General report.

Read more

Pages