Florangela Davila

Lead Artscape Reporter

Florangela Davila  has been a journalist since 1992. For 14 years she worked at The Seattle Times where she covered both news and features. She's been freelancing for KPLU since 2008, reporting and producing as well as helping coordinate the station's "Looking Back to Look Forward" documentary project. She's also a lecturer in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington. Florangela received her B.A. from U.C. Berkeley and her Master's in Journalism from Columbia University. She's been both an arts consumer and an arts practitioner for as long as she can remember.

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Homeless Youth
5:00 am
Tue August 19, 2014

Voices From The Street, Part 3

Florangela Davila

Editor's Note: This is the third in a series of radio conversations between homeless youth. Voices will also be broadcast as part of the Kids@Risk coverage on Crosscut.com.

 

Artscape
5:00 am
Mon August 11, 2014

Actor Marya Sea Kaminski Takes On Epic Play 'Angels In America'

Courtesy of Christopher Monsos Intiman Theatre

  

Twenty years ago, Seattle’s Intiman Theater was the first regional company in the country to produce “Angels in America.” The 1993 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama is a sweeping tale about the deadly AIDS epidemic from the 1980s.

It’s a cathartic story about politics, sexuality, religion and forgiveness. The protagonist in the story is a young gay man who is fighting AIDS, is abandoned by his boyfriend and becomes a prophet after being visited by an Angel of God.

Considered an American masterpiece, the play has been adapted into an HBO mini-series as well as an opera.But those who have seen a live production will tell you it’s meant to be seen on stage.

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Artscape
5:00 am
Mon August 4, 2014

Meet A Young New York-Based Brass Ensemble With Some Serious Seattle Roots

The Westerlies recorded their debut album in a family friend's house on Lopez Island in the San Juan Islands.
Andrew Swanson

The Westerlies are a new young brass ensemble based out of New York City. They’re an all-over-the-musical-map group whose first album is already garnering critical praise.

And this first bit of success could have something to do with their Seattle roots. All four musicians, all in their 20s, grew up in Seattle where they absorbed much of the local music scene. They’re the product of two of the best high school jazz programs in the country: Garfield and Roosevelt high schools. And their debut album, recorded in a family friend’s cabin on Lopez Island, is a reinterpretation of an eclectic mix of compositions by Seattlelite Wayne Horvitz.

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Artscape
5:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Seattle Opera's Jenkins Looks Back At His Legacy, Including Making 'Colorblind’ Opera

Speight Jenkins greets patrons at an event for the 2013 Ring opera.
© Brandon Patoc

Speight Jenkins is stepping down as general director of Seattle Opera after 31 years. And among the things he’s most proud of are the productions of two successful Ring cycles, surviving the economic recession by not resorting to just producing popular operas and advancing the opportunities for African-American men.

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Artscape
7:30 am
Mon July 14, 2014

Here's A Taste Of A New Album That Salutes Seattle’s Forgotten Funk And Soul Scene

Cover art for the 1987 LP "Our Night Out" by Romel Westwood, one of the musicians featured on "Wheedle's Groove: Seattle Funk, Modern Soul & Boogie Volume II 1972-1987"
Light in the Attic Records

Back in the day — we’re talking the 1960s, '70s and ‘80s — local Seattle bands played funk and soul music in the city’s dance clubs.

The music was the soundtrack of a black-owned radio station operating out of the Central Area called KYAC.

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Artscape
5:00 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Seattle Gilbert And Sullivan Society Celebrates Composers' Enduring Popularity

Lydia Salo, 13, rehearses "The Mikado" for an upcoming show with the Seattle Gilbert and Sullivan Society.
Florangela Davila

At 6-foot-3, Garry Webberly is a towering figure with a head of white hair and a matching mustache. The 76-year-old Webberly's musical tastes run from classical to classic rock. But for the past 48 years, he’s taken to the stage to perform in volunteer productions of Gilbert and Sullivan operettas.

“It’s good music, great dialogue. I love it all,” Webberly said about the operettas that are known for their wit, their absurdly complicated plots and technically-challenging songs.

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Arts
5:00 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Author Alex Tizon Examines What It’s Like To Be An Asian-American Man

In his new memoir, Alex Tizon explores the experience and pysche of being an Asian American man.
Daniel D. Morrison

As a boy growing up in the 1960s and ‘70s, Alex Tizon was well aware of a racial hierarchy that existed, a hierarchy that put him, a Filipino immigrant, at the bottom. 

His parents admired white Americans and all things western. Tizon once caught his father massaging and pinching his nose to make it sharper and narrower, and less round and Filipino-looking.

“I took it a step farther,” Tizon said. “I used to put clothespins on my nose.”

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Jazz and Blues
5:00 am
Fri June 6, 2014

Film Tells Story Of How A 90-Year-Old Jazz Icon Became Friends With A Young Pianist

Pianist Justin Kauflin and jazz legend Clark Terry in a still from the film, "Keep on Keepin' On"

Justin Kauflin is a young twentysomething pianist who, at age 11, lost his eyesight.

Jazz legend Clark Terry — the revolutionary flugelhornist who played with Count Basie and Duke Ellington, and mentored Quincy Jones and Miles Davis — shares something with Kauflin. Diabetes claimed his eyesight.

But that’s not the only reason the two musicians, who are separated by nearly 70 years, became close friends. The story of the bond between teacher and mentee is told in the new documentary “Keep On Keepin’ On,” which is being shown at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival. The film also celebrates Terry, who, even from his hospital bed, coaches Kauflin as he sets out to forge his own jazz career.

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Homeless Youth
5:00 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Voices From The Street, Part 2

Fahad Ali, who didn't want his face shown, wears the coat that kept him warm when he was homeless in Minnesota.
Florangela Davila

Editor's Note: This is the first in a series of radio conversations between homeless youth. Voices will also be broadcast as part of the Kids@Risk coverage on Crosscut.com. 

Generation M
9:25 am
Thu May 8, 2014

A Millennial Lives Without Religion And He Says Life Is Just Fine

When it comes to religion, young adults feel a lot differently about the subject than previous generations.

People in their 20s are less likely to be affiliated with organized religion. They’re also more likely to say they don’t believe in God. So what’s it like to be a young person navigating life without faith?

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Homeless Youth
4:59 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Voices From The Street, Part 1

Florangela Davila

Editor's Note: This is the first in a series of radio conversations between homeless youth. Voices will also be broadcast as part of the Kids@Risk coverage on Crosscut.com. 

Seattle's Jazz History
5:00 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Once Hub Of Seattle's Jazz Scene, 100-Year-Old Washington Hall Continuing Arts Tradition

Washington Hall as it looked like back in the day.
Puget Sound Regional Archives

Seattle had more than two dozen jazz clubs at the height of the jazz era. Only one of them is still catering to live music: the 100-year-old Washington Hall.

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Arts
5:00 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Meet The City Of Seattle's New Director Of Film And Music

Kate Becker is the new director of Seattle's Office of Film and Music

Imagine getting a job — but in doing so, replacing a friend whose firing prompted more than 1,200 people to sign a petition calling for his return. 

That was the situation Kate Becker faced as she took over the city of Seattle’s Office of Film and Music.

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Education
5:00 am
Mon March 10, 2014

UW Launches Minor In Arctic Studies

UW and Inuit students in the 2011 Jackson School Task Force on Arctic Sovereignty in Ottawa. Student interest in classes like this prompted the UW to launch an Arctic Studies minor
Nadine Fabbi

Curiosity about what’s happening in some of the coldest places on Earth has prompted the University of Washington to launch its first Arctic Studies minor.

The program is the first of its kind offered by a university in the lower 48. 

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Education
5:00 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Listen: At UW, A Science Fair For Schoolkids Features Human Brains And Spinal Cords

Human brains, sheep brains and human spinal cords were featured in hands-on exhibits at the "Brain Awareness Week" Open House at the UW.
Florangela Davila

Each March, scientists around the world host open houses to get people thinking about the brain.

The events are all part of Brain Awareness Week.

At the University of Washington, that means the mother of all science fairs in a room decked out with human brains, spinal cords, finch chirping and flying fruit flies.

Take an audio tour of an event that drew more than 650 elementary and high school students.

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