Florangela Davila

Lead Artscape Reporter

Florangela Davila  has been a journalist since 1992. For 14 years she worked at The Seattle Times where she covered both news and features. She's been freelancing for KPLU since 2008, reporting and producing as well as helping coordinate the station's "Looking Back to Look Forward" documentary project. She's also a lecturer in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington. Florangela received her B.A. from U.C. Berkeley and her Master's in Journalism from Columbia University. She's been both an arts consumer and an arts practitioner for as long as she can remember.

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Artscape
7:30 am
Mon July 14, 2014

Here's A Taste Of A New Album That Salutes Seattle’s Forgotten Funk And Soul Scene

Cover art for the 1987 LP "Our Night Out" by Romel Westwood, one of the musicians featured on "Wheedle's Groove: Seattle Funk, Modern Soul & Boogie Volume II 1972-1987"
Light in the Attic Records

Back in the day — we’re talking the 1960s, '70s and ‘80s — local Seattle bands played funk and soul music in the city’s dance clubs.

The music was the soundtrack of a black-owned radio station operating out of the Central Area called KYAC.

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Artscape
5:00 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Seattle Gilbert And Sullivan Society Celebrates Composers' Enduring Popularity

Lydia Salo, 13, rehearses "The Mikado" for an upcoming show with the Seattle Gilbert and Sullivan Society.
Florangela Davila

At 6-foot-3, Garry Webberly is a towering figure with a head of white hair and a matching mustache. The 76-year-old Webberly's musical tastes run from classical to classic rock. But for the past 48 years, he’s taken to the stage to perform in volunteer productions of Gilbert and Sullivan operettas.

“It’s good music, great dialogue. I love it all,” Webberly said about the operettas that are known for their wit, their absurdly complicated plots and technically-challenging songs.

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Arts
5:00 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Author Alex Tizon Examines What It’s Like To Be An Asian-American Man

In his new memoir, Alex Tizon explores the experience and pysche of being an Asian American man.
Daniel D. Morrison

As a boy growing up in the 1960s and ‘70s, Alex Tizon was well aware of a racial hierarchy that existed, a hierarchy that put him, a Filipino immigrant, at the bottom. 

His parents admired white Americans and all things western. Tizon once caught his father massaging and pinching his nose to make it sharper and narrower, and less round and Filipino-looking.

“I took it a step farther,” Tizon said. “I used to put clothespins on my nose.”

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Jazz and Blues
5:00 am
Fri June 6, 2014

Film Tells Story Of How A 90-Year-Old Jazz Icon Became Friends With A Young Pianist

Pianist Justin Kauflin and jazz legend Clark Terry in a still from the film, "Keep on Keepin' On"

Justin Kauflin is a young twentysomething pianist who, at age 11, lost his eyesight.

Jazz legend Clark Terry — the revolutionary flugelhornist who played with Count Basie and Duke Ellington, and mentored Quincy Jones and Miles Davis — shares something with Kauflin. Diabetes claimed his eyesight.

But that’s not the only reason the two musicians, who are separated by nearly 70 years, became close friends. The story of the bond between teacher and mentee is told in the new documentary “Keep On Keepin’ On,” which is being shown at this year’s Seattle International Film Festival. The film also celebrates Terry, who, even from his hospital bed, coaches Kauflin as he sets out to forge his own jazz career.

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Homeless Youth
5:00 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Voices From The Street, Part 2

Fahad Ali, who didn't want his face shown, wears the coat that kept him warm when he was homeless in Minnesota.
Florangela Davila

Editor's Note: This is the first in a series of radio conversations between homeless youth. Voices will also be broadcast as part of the Kids@Risk coverage on Crosscut.com. 

Generation M
9:25 am
Thu May 8, 2014

A Millennial Lives Without Religion And He Says Life Is Just Fine

When it comes to religion, young adults feel a lot differently about the subject than previous generations.

People in their 20s are less likely to be affiliated with organized religion. They’re also more likely to say they don’t believe in God. So what’s it like to be a young person navigating life without faith?

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Homeless Youth
4:59 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Voices From The Street, Part 1

Florangela Davila

Editor's Note: This is the first in a series of radio conversations between homeless youth. Voices will also be broadcast as part of the Kids@Risk coverage on Crosscut.com. 

Seattle's Jazz History
5:00 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Once Hub Of Seattle's Jazz Scene, 100-Year-Old Washington Hall Continuing Arts Tradition

Washington Hall as it looked like back in the day.
Puget Sound Regional Archives

Seattle had more than two dozen jazz clubs at the height of the jazz era. Only one of them is still catering to live music: the 100-year-old Washington Hall.

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Arts
5:00 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Meet The City Of Seattle's New Director Of Film And Music

Kate Becker is the new director of Seattle's Office of Film and Music

Imagine getting a job — but in doing so, replacing a friend whose firing prompted more than 1,200 people to sign a petition calling for his return. 

That was the situation Kate Becker faced as she took over the city of Seattle’s Office of Film and Music.

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Education
5:00 am
Mon March 10, 2014

UW Launches Minor In Arctic Studies

UW and Inuit students in the 2011 Jackson School Task Force on Arctic Sovereignty in Ottawa. Student interest in classes like this prompted the UW to launch an Arctic Studies minor
Nadine Fabbi

Curiosity about what’s happening in some of the coldest places on Earth has prompted the University of Washington to launch its first Arctic Studies minor.

The program is the first of its kind offered by a university in the lower 48. 

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Education
5:00 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Listen: At UW, A Science Fair For Schoolkids Features Human Brains And Spinal Cords

Human brains, sheep brains and human spinal cords were featured in hands-on exhibits at the "Brain Awareness Week" Open House at the UW.
Florangela Davila

Each March, scientists around the world host open houses to get people thinking about the brain.

The events are all part of Brain Awareness Week.

At the University of Washington, that means the mother of all science fairs in a room decked out with human brains, spinal cords, finch chirping and flying fruit flies.

Take an audio tour of an event that drew more than 650 elementary and high school students.

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Homelessness
5:00 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Seattle's Union Gospel Mission Launching Clothing Line

A limited number of OLU t-shirts will feature a homeless person being served by Seattle's Union Gospel Mission. Pictured on this shirt is R.J. Burrows.
Seattle's Union Gospel Mission

Seattle’s Union Gospel Mission is getting into the fashion merchandising business with the launch of a clothing line called OLU, or Others Like Us.

The line will include T-shirts, a hoodie, a baseball cap and a beanie featuring a logo that looks like a face. One T-shirt design will also feature a photo of a homeless person.

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On Strength
5:26 am
Mon March 3, 2014

5 Steps To Overcoming Trauma, As Explained By Nobel Peace Prize Winner

Jerry White speaking to veterans and mental health workers at the American Lake VA Medical Center in Lakewood.
John Froschauer

There comes a time in people’s lives when an event changes everything in their world.

For Jerry White, that moment came when he was 20, while studying abroad in Israel. That’s when he lost his leg.

White was hiking with friends when he stepped on a landmine.

“Suddenly, I was hiking, and boom! I have no foot,” he said.

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Education
4:56 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

USDA Proposes New Standards For Marketing Of Foods In Schools

Schools should take note of how food is marketed to children on campus, according to new guidelines for school wellness policies proposed by the Department of Agriculture and First Lady Michelle Obama.

The guidelines are the latest step in a process that began four years ago under the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010.

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Education
4:19 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Adjunct Faculty At Seattle U Seeks To Unionize

Curtis Cronn Flickr

The local chapter of the Service Employees International Union has filed a petition on behalf of adjunct faculty members at Seattle University.

The adjunct faculty members, which include part-time, temporary and other contingent instructors, want better teaching conditions, including higher pay.

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