Florangela Davila

Lead Artscape Reporter

Florangela Davila  has been a journalist since 1992. For 14 years she worked at The Seattle Times where she covered both news and features. She's been freelancing for KPLU since 2008, reporting and producing as well as helping coordinate the station's "Looking Back to Look Forward" documentary project. She's also a lecturer in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington. Florangela received her B.A. from U.C. Berkeley and her Master's in Journalism from Columbia University. She's been both an arts consumer and an arts practitioner for as long as she can remember.

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Generation M
9:25 am
Thu May 8, 2014

A Millennial Lives Without Religion And He Says Life Is Just Fine

When it comes to religion, young adults feel a lot differently about the subject than previous generations.

People in their 20s are less likely to be affiliated with organized religion. They’re also more likely to say they don’t believe in God. So what’s it like to be a young person navigating life without faith?

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Homeless Youth
4:59 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Voices From The Street, Part 1

Florangela Davila

Editor's Note: This is the first in a series of radio conversations between homeless youth. Voices will also be broadcast as part of the Kids@Risk coverage on Crosscut.com. 

Seattle's Jazz History
5:00 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Once Hub Of Seattle's Jazz Scene, 100-Year-Old Washington Hall Continuing Arts Tradition

Washington Hall as it looked like back in the day.
Puget Sound Regional Archives

Seattle had more than two dozen jazz clubs at the height of the jazz era. Only one of them is still catering to live music: the 100-year-old Washington Hall.

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Arts
5:00 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Meet The City Of Seattle's New Director Of Film And Music

Kate Becker is the new director of Seattle's Office of Film and Music

Imagine getting a job — but in doing so, replacing a friend whose firing prompted more than 1,200 people to sign a petition calling for his return. 

That was the situation Kate Becker faced as she took over the city of Seattle’s Office of Film and Music.

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Education
5:00 am
Mon March 10, 2014

UW Launches Minor In Arctic Studies

UW and Inuit students in the 2011 Jackson School Task Force on Arctic Sovereignty in Ottawa. Student interest in classes like this prompted the UW to launch an Arctic Studies minor
Nadine Fabbi

Curiosity about what’s happening in some of the coldest places on Earth has prompted the University of Washington to launch its first Arctic Studies minor.

The program is the first of its kind offered by a university in the lower 48. 

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Education
5:00 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Listen: At UW, A Science Fair For Schoolkids Features Human Brains And Spinal Cords

Human brains, sheep brains and human spinal cords were featured in hands-on exhibits at the "Brain Awareness Week" Open House at the UW.
Florangela Davila

Each March, scientists around the world host open houses to get people thinking about the brain.

The events are all part of Brain Awareness Week.

At the University of Washington, that means the mother of all science fairs in a room decked out with human brains, spinal cords, finch chirping and flying fruit flies.

Take an audio tour of an event that drew more than 650 elementary and high school students.

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Homelessness
5:00 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Seattle's Union Gospel Mission Launching Clothing Line

A limited number of OLU t-shirts will feature a homeless person being served by Seattle's Union Gospel Mission. Pictured on this shirt is R.J. Burrows.
Seattle's Union Gospel Mission

Seattle’s Union Gospel Mission is getting into the fashion merchandising business with the launch of a clothing line called OLU, or Others Like Us.

The line will include T-shirts, a hoodie, a baseball cap and a beanie featuring a logo that looks like a face. One T-shirt design will also feature a photo of a homeless person.

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On Strength
5:26 am
Mon March 3, 2014

5 Steps To Overcoming Trauma, As Explained By Nobel Peace Prize Winner

Jerry White speaking to veterans and mental health workers at the American Lake VA Medical Center in Lakewood.
John Froschauer

There comes a time in people’s lives when an event changes everything in their world.

For Jerry White, that moment came when he was 20, while studying abroad in Israel. That’s when he lost his leg.

White was hiking with friends when he stepped on a landmine.

“Suddenly, I was hiking, and boom! I have no foot,” he said.

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Education
4:56 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

USDA Proposes New Standards For Marketing Of Foods In Schools

Schools should take note of how food is marketed to children on campus, according to new guidelines for school wellness policies proposed by the Department of Agriculture and First Lady Michelle Obama.

The guidelines are the latest step in a process that began four years ago under the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010.

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Education
4:19 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Adjunct Faculty At Seattle U Seeks To Unionize

Curtis Cronn Flickr

The local chapter of the Service Employees International Union has filed a petition on behalf of adjunct faculty members at Seattle University.

The adjunct faculty members, which include part-time, temporary and other contingent instructors, want better teaching conditions, including higher pay.

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Endowment 2.0
5:04 am
Wed February 19, 2014

University Of Puget Sound Receives $10,000 In Bitcoins From Alum

Nicholas Cary is seen making his bitcoin contribution to the University of Puget Sound from his hotel room in Berlin.
University of Puget Sound

As a 2007 alum of University of Puget Sound, Nicolas Cary has already established himself. The 28-year-old is the CEO of Blockchain, which runs the world's most popular digital wallet for bitcoin, a virtual currency.

But now he's making headlines for his bitcoin contribution to UPS. Cary has electronically transferred just over 14.5 bitcoins to the university, which was then exchanged into $10,000 actual U.S. dollars. It's reportedly the first donation of its kind to a U.S. college or university.

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Education
5:00 am
Tue February 18, 2014

At Seattle Elementary, Philosopher Helps Kids Explore The 'Why' Questions

Jana Mohr Lone leads a philosophy class at John Muir Elementary
Florangela Davila

Students at Seattle's John Muir Elementary School are trying to answer life's big questions. Along with reading and math, the school's curriculum includes philosophy. 

Why philosophy? Kids start asking all sorts of "why" questions starting in preschool, says philosopher Jana Mohr Lone: "Why is the sky blue? Why are some things in color and some things aren’t? Can you be happy and sad at the same time?"

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Rideshares Services
5:00 am
Wed February 12, 2014

Seattle To Consider Regulating Rideshare Services

In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, Lyft passenger Christina Shatzen gets into a car driven by Nancy Tcheou in San Francisco.
Jeff Chiu AP Photo

The Seattle City Council will consider a pilot program to regulate rideshare services with training and insurance requirements, as well as a cap on the number of licenses. 

App-based services like Sidecar, UberX and Lyft are becoming common alternatives to using taxis. And that's not necessarily a bad thing, says Seattle City Council member Mike O’Brien.

"Technology and new ideas have fundamentally changed the way we all think about transportation, and that’s just part of the reality going forward," O'Brien said.

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Politics
4:55 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Audit: Wash. State Can Do More To Help Families Who Adopt Foster Kids

Washington state could do a better job when it comes to assisting families who’ve adopted children from foster care, according to a report by the state auditor's office. 

That’s especially the case for families who’ve adopted children with special needs or those who have been diagnosed with emotional or physical problems, the office found.

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Arts
5:00 am
Mon February 10, 2014

Two 'Monuments Men' Who Helped Preserve Art During WWII Hailed From Wash. State

Sherman Lee of Seattle, a "Monuments Man" who also served as associate director at the Seattle Art Museum in the late 1940s.
Undated photo via The Associate Press, courtesy of SAM

The movie “The Monuments Men” spotlights a platoon of real-life U.S. soldiers who rescued artistic masterpieces from the Nazis during World War II. 

Overall, there were approximately 350 men and women from 13 nations who fought to preserve art from the ravages of war. Two of them came from Washington state.

Sherman Lee, who was born in Seattle, was an expert in Asian art who served as associate director at the Seattle Art Museum in the late 1940s.

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