Florangela Davila

Lead Artscape Reporter

Florangela Davila  has been a journalist since 1992. For 14 years she worked at The Seattle Times where she covered both news and features. She's been freelancing for KPLU since 2008, reporting and producing as well as helping coordinate the station's "Looking Back to Look Forward" documentary project. She's also a lecturer in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington. Florangela received her B.A. from U.C. Berkeley and her Master's in Journalism from Columbia University. She's been both an arts consumer and an arts practitioner for as long as she can remember.

Pages

Local Arts
6:00 am
Thu March 21, 2013

A final gift for Seattle from philanthropist Bagley Wright

This artist's rendering shows the installation “MIRROR” by artist Doug Aitken.
Seattle Art Museum

If you’re a Seattle arts and culture lover, you owe a lot to a man named Bagley Wright.

The Space Needle, Benaroya Hall, Seattle Repertory Theater — Wright helped build or create all of them.

Then there’s the art he’s given to the city.

Read more
Multimedia
12:46 pm
Tue December 11, 2012

Watch: A personal look at Seattle's first same-sex ceremonies

Barbara Kinney for KPLU

On December 9, 2012, same-sex marriage became legal in Washington State, one of the first states to do so by popular vote. Wedding ceremonies began at 12:01 a.m. that day.

KPLU's Florangela Davila and photographer Barbara Kinney take a look at what unfolded during the first eight hours at the King County Courthouse in downtown Seattle.

Arts
5:28 am
Mon October 1, 2012

At Seattle Rep, a play about the Pullman Porters

"Pullman Porter Blues" at the Seattle Rep features a blues band, shown here in rehearsal.
Andry Laurence

Seattle Repertory Theatre opens its season Wednesday with a world premiere play about a group of African American workers known as the Pullman porters.

"Pullman Porter Blues" looks at three generations in one family of porters. The Pullman porters were former slaves who worked on a luxurious fleet of sleeper cars beginning in the late 19th century. Their descendants worked the trains up until the 1960s.

Read more
Artscape
4:50 am
Mon July 23, 2012

Intiman's new summer festival means bold and crazy busy for local actors

Timothy McCuen Piggee as Judge Brack in "Hedda Gabler," part of Intiman Theatre's Summer festival
Chris Bennion

After running out of money and shutting down last year, Intiman Theatre is back with a groundbreaking summer festival.

"Groundbreaking" because the theater has a new repertory format: a cast of 17 actors -- Intiman's Class of 2012 -- staffing all four summer productions.

For audiences, that means a chance to see an actor stretch in various roles: "Romeo and Juliet" one day; a drag queen take on Helen Keller the next.

Read more
Artscape
5:27 am
Mon July 9, 2012

In Seattle's International District, celebrating the Higo Variety Store

Masako (left) and Ayako Murakami in their Higo Variety Store.
Dean Wong

An old five-and dime store that helped Seattle's Japanese community rebuild itself after World War II is being celebrated in a new way: in a permanent exhibit by the Wing Luke Museum in a local gift shop/art gallery.

The exhibit features a variety of old store merchandise from a business that lasted 96 years. There's also an assortment of personal items from two generations of the Japanese-American Murakami family.

Read more
Artscape
5:30 am
Mon July 2, 2012

At the Seattle Art Museum: Australian Aboriginal art

"Wilkinkarra (09.003) 2007" by Mitjili Napanangka Gibson. Promised gift of Margaret Levi and Robert Kaplan, T2011.55.2

A new exhibit at the Seattle Art Museum invites us to experience Australia like we never have before: through the eyes of Aboriginal artists whose culture is considered to be one of the oldest in the world.

More than 100 paintings, sculptures and photographs are featured in this first-of-its kind show on the West Coast. The exhibit is called "Ancestral Modern," a title that relates to the fact that Aboriginal culture is at least 50,000 years old but the artwork on display is no more than 40 years old.

Read more
Artscape
4:44 am
Mon June 18, 2012

At ACT, an edgy and provocative production about inmates

Ray Tagavilla (l) as a prison guard and Dumi as Lucius Jenkins in Azeotrope's production of "Jesus Hopped the A Train" at Seattle's ACT Theatre.
Jessica Martin

On stage at ACT Theater is a play about two inmates and their different outlooks on life. One man is on Death Row and has found God. The other is facing attempted murder charges and has lost faith.

The play is called "Jesus Hopped the A Train." It was written by Stephen Adly Guirgis and world premiered in New York in 2000.

Now it's in Seattle, in a production by a Seattle company called Azeotrope that thrives on material that's edgy and provocative.

Read more
Artscape
5:11 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Khambatta Dance looks at where gestures come from

Siamak Poursabahian

Where do gestures come from? Is it nature or nuture...or just from our own imagination?

Khambatta Dance Company explores these questions in performances this week at the Seattle International Dance Festival/Beyond the Threshold. In a work called "India Calling," the Seattle-based company looks at the gestures we've inherited from our parents.

The piece, for five dancers who wear red costumes, includes live monologues and videotaped interviews of people telling stories about gestures.

Read more
Artscape
5:02 am
Mon May 28, 2012

Now playing at Teatro Zinzanni: a Latino-themed 'Caliente' show

Mark Kitaoka

Teatro Zinzanni, which has been around since 1998, serves up a different kind of dinner theater. Acrobatics as an appetizer. A contortionist with your crudite.

Housed in a red-and-yellow antique mirrored spiegeltent, Zinzanni delivers shows served alongside a five-course meal. The waiters dance. The audience participates. The concept started in Seattle and it was so successful, Zinzanni now also has shows at a venue in San Francisco.

But the show now playing is a first for the venue and it's also more personal for the star performers.

Read more
Artscape
5:02 am
Mon May 21, 2012

At SIFF, local film "Eden" spins a true tale of sex trafficking

Jamie Chung plays a Korean-American teen kidnapped and forced into sexual slavery in the movie "Eden."
Sean Porter

The film "Eden" tells the story of human trafficking through the tale of a Korean American teen in New Mexico. It's part horror film and part survivor's tale and it's based on a true story.

It's Seattle director Megan Griffith's third feature film.  And it's a project she was drawn to because of the actual narrative:

Read more
Artscape
4:58 am
Mon May 14, 2012

At Seattle Opera, "Madama Butterfly" features a 39-pound non-diva

Patricia Racette as Cio-Cio San and Gabriella Mercado as her son in Seattle Opera's "Madama Butterfly."
Elise Bakketun

"Madama Butterfly” is a story about love, heartbreak and sacrifice and it’s beloved by opera fans worldwide.

It’s the current production at Seattle Opera. The cast features superstar soprano Patricia Racette, who has played the role at least 100 times, including at the Metropolitan Opera in New York.

Read more
Arts
5:05 am
Fri May 4, 2012

Playing at Lincoln Center: Ballard High, 2 other Seattle area schools

Members of the Ballard High School jazz band, which is one of 15 finalists in the Essentially Ellington High School Jazz Band competition.
Photo by Florangela Davila

The most prestigious high school jazz band competition begins today in New York City.  And among the 15 finalists are three local competitors: Roosevelt, Mountlake Terrace and newcomer Ballard High School.

"I think we surprised a lot of people," says Ballard's jazz band director Michael James, about being a finalist in the Essentially Ellington jazz band competition. "But I knew if we were able to get into this festival it would put us on people's radar and say, 'Hey, what's going on at Ballard?'"

Read more
Artscape
4:42 am
Mon April 23, 2012

At Seattle's Balagan Theatre, a rock musical about the trials of teendom

Bryan Gula, center, and cast sing "The Bitch of Living" in Balagan Theatre's production of "Spring Awakening."
Pamela M. Campi Photography

Three months after a sell-out run, “Spring Awakening” is back in a production at  Seattle’s Balagan Theatre.

Read more
Artscape
5:03 am
Mon April 16, 2012

A 'dog' narrates the story in a new play at Book-It Theatre

David S. Hogan plays Enzo, a dog, and the narrator in "The Art of Racing In the Rain" at Book-It Theatre

“The Art of Racing in the Rain” tells the story of a wannabe race car driver living in Seattle. The story, though, is told through the eyes, ears and nose of a unique narrator: an especially philosophical dog.

Read more
Artscape
4:55 am
Mon April 9, 2012

At Pacific Northwest Ballet, an old 'Apollo' teaches a first-timer

Principal dancer Seth Orza (left) rehearses "Apollo" with artistic director (and former New York City Ballet dancer) Peter Boal at Pacific Northwest Ballet in Seattle.
Photo by Lindsay Thomas

The ballet “Apollo” features four dancers in a story about the Greek god of music and three muses.

It was a signature role for Peter Boal when he was a dancer with New York City Ballet.

Now he's staging the ballet at Pacific Northwest Ballet, the first time since taking over as artistic director in 2005. And Boal is teaching the ballet to four male dancers who'll be dancing the role for the first time.

He says he's been waiting all these years for the right time as well as the right dancers.

Read more

Pages