Jennifer Wing

Special Projects Reporter

Jennifer Wing is an on-call reporter and news host for KPLU. She’s from Philadelphia, but has been living in the Northwest for well over a decade. Jennifer has had many memorable KPLU radio moments over the years, but one that sticks with her is being allowed to watch a young man struggle to learn how to read. Jennifer says, “He'd made it all the way through middle school and most of high school not knowing how. He finally fell into the hands of some adults who cared enough to give him the time and attention he needed.”

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I Wonder Why ... ?
4:30 am
Fri January 6, 2012

Why is the 'Seattle Freeze' so hard to melt?

Is Seattle a great but lonely place to live?

The city often ranks pretty high on those lists of the best places to move to – There’s the food, the water, the mountains, the music. But once people get here, they find it’s pretty tough to make friends. There’s even a name for it: The Seattle Freeze.

We wondered: When did the freeze set in? And, how can a newcomer ever break through it? 

Read more on I Wonder Why ... ?

I Wonder Why ... ?
4:30 am
Fri November 25, 2011

Just why is it that Seattleites don't jaywalk?

In Seattle, pedestrians are more likely to wait at an empty intersection than jaywalk.

Fear of a ticket from paternalistic police? Group angst? Peer pressure?

Whatever the reason, even if a car is not in sight, Seattleites will often wait patiently for the light to change rather than … jaywalk.

Pedestrians in this city are unlike their fellow walkers in San Francisco, Boston and even Portland, Ore., and the culture of waiting at the light goes back decades.

Read more on I Wonder Why ... ?

Artscape
5:13 am
Sun November 13, 2011

Luminous art with some baggage

"Gate" by Do Ho Suh
Seattle Art Museum

Seattle is home to one of the most extensive collections of Asian art in North America. It lives at the Seattle Asian Art Museum in Volunteer Park. But over the next several weeks the collection’s best pieces are on display at the Seattle Art Museum in downtown.

The exhibit is called Luminous: The Art of Asia. It features ancient Buddhas, delicate pottery, and a new modern work which ties everything together and transports you to a different place.

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Artscape
8:27 am
Sun October 23, 2011

Carolee Schneemann still pushing the edges of decorum

Jane Brakhage
Carolee Schneemann

There are some works of art that can make people really uncomfortable.

Artist Carolee Schneemann is a master at pushing the edges of decorum. She’s also one of the first people in the early 1960’s to ever be called a performance artist.

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Artscape
8:00 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Prof. Fred revels in the marvel of movies so bad, they're good

Fred and Igor.

Can something be so terrible it’s actually good? Professor Fred Hopkins thinks so.

By day, Hopkins is a lawyer who helps people get out of paying big fines for traffic infractions. But in his spare time he is the enthusiastic host of Movie Marvels, a show that runs once a week on Seattle’s Community College TV channel.

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Cityscape
3:55 pm
Fri July 22, 2011

'Mad Art' houses blossom on Seattle's Capitol Hill

Two of the 'Mad Art' houses on Seattle's Capitol Hill.
Jon Klapel KPLU

Four craftsman houses in Seattle’s Capitol Hill Neighborhood will soon be replaced by new apartments, but for now they are being taken over by a small army of artists to create something completely unexpected for the public to enjoy.

(Updated with photos and videos inside)

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Artscape
9:00 am
Sun July 17, 2011

Exploring the limits of privacy at Henry's 'The Talent Show'

Stranger (6) 1999 by Shizuka Yokomizo
Shizuka Yokomizo Collection of Leslie Cohan, Minneapolis

The desire to be on the public stage is on display right now at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle. It’s called “The Talent Show.” The exhibit raises a lot of questions ranging from how much should we put on display to what happens to our images once they are out there.

It’s easy to forget how much effort went in to trying to be seen by the public eye.

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Artscape
7:00 am
Sun May 29, 2011

The art of disaster

HItler Teapot by Charles Krafft
Charles Krafft

When you think of porcelain, your grandmother’s fancy dishes might come to mind. The ones that are taken out of the cabinet only for Thanksgiving and other special holidays. Or maybe you own a beautiful china vase.

There are a lot of delicate dishes and trinkets in the home of Seattle artist Charles Krafft. But his pieces go beyond pastels and pretty flowers.

Krafft has made a career out of messing with our expectations of ceramic art. Pouring tea from one of his teapots or eating from one of Krafft’s plates might make you lose your appetite.

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Education
10:25 pm
Thu May 12, 2011

Desmond Tutu makes last public appearance in the Northwest

Nobel Peace Laureate Desmond Tutu
Associated Press

The former Archbishop of Cape Town, South Africa and Nobel Peace Laureate, Desmond Tutu is scheduled to speak to more than seven-thousand people at the Tacoma Dome Friday night.

His appearance is expected to be his last public event on the West Coast as he settles into retirement. Tutu met with students a day before his talk at the Dome. He told them that even thought they may want to be famous someday and make huge changes in the world, it’s the little acts of compassion in life that make a difference

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Artscape
12:34 am
Sun May 1, 2011

The Agony & Ecstasy of Steve Jobs

Mike Daisey—pictured here in front of a famous monument to Deng Xiaopheng, in Shenzhen, China—returns to Berkeley Rep with an audacious new monologue: The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs.
Ursa Waz

Modern life can be difficult to live without help from our smart-phones and other gadgets. Apple is at the forefront of this technology and its users are often incredibly loyal. But a new show by monologist Mike Daisey at the Seattle Repertory Theater raises the point that all of this beautiful design and convenience comes at a cost to factory workers in China.

The production is called “The Agony and Ecstasy of Steve Jobs.”

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Artscape
12:30 am
Mon April 18, 2011

"Taking Punk To The Masses" opens at Experience Music Project

Members of Nirvana (l to r: Dave Grohl, Kurt Cobain, Krist Novoselic) do their "Beatles wave" while boarding a flight out of Australia in 1992.
Courtesy of Shelli Hyrkas

This week marks the 20th anniversary of when an audience heard Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” for the first time. The band played it at Seattle’s OK Hotel near Pioneer Square and the rest as they say, is history. A new exhibit at the Experience Music Project called “Taking Punk To The Masses: from Nowhere to Nevermind” looks at all of the factors that led to Nirvana explosion onto the global music scene.

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Artscape Encore
1:53 pm
Tue March 29, 2011

Ukuleles bring the islands to Tukwila

Students playing ukuleles is a common sight at Tukwila's Foster High School. The instrument is enjoying a surge in popularity.
Jennifer Wing/KPLU

The little ukulele is having a moment in the spotlight. It has come a long way since Tiny Tim tiptoed through the tulips. 

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Artscape
4:18 am
Mon March 14, 2011

The Official Bad Art Museum of Art, aka The OBAMA

Baby

We all know where to go to see “great” art. But what about really “bad” art? Where do you see that collection?Well, you are in luck because Seattle has its very own Official Bad Art Museum of Art. It’s The “OBAMA.” The collection’s curators are the Seattle couple Marlow Harris and Jo David.

Club House for the Creative

The museum is housed inside Cafe Racer, a blue, nondescript coffee house and bar right at the edge of the University District in Seattle.

The people who hang out here are burlesque artists, cartoonists, musicians and the occasional sword swallower. It’s a club house for the creative. To get into the “OBAMA” isn’t easy. Joe David says the artwork has to meet a certain standard."

“It’s a piece that started out with the right intentions and then something horribly went wrong along the way.”

Yes, the pieces are bad, but they are still interesting to view. The collection goes well beyond "Dogs Playing Poker." 

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Education
8:17 am
Thu March 3, 2011

Goodloe-Johnson fired; Enfield to lead Seattle Schools

One of the signs outside Seattle Schools headquarters Wednesday evening. Superintendent Maria Goodloe-Johnson was fired after a unanimous vote by the school board.
ErikaJSchultz Twitpic

Seattle's school board fired Superintendent Maria Goodloe-Johnson and Don Kennedy, the district's chief financial officer, Wednesday evening, as was widely anticipated. The votes were unanimous.

The action was swift retribution following revelations of a financial scandal that drew the anger of board members and the public. The board then voted 6-1 to appoint Susan Enfield as interim superintendent.

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Artscape
6:09 am
Mon February 28, 2011

A look at "The New, New, News: A Living Newspaper"

The tweets from the Maurice Clemmon's manhunt come to life when actors dressed in bird suits shout out tweets in rapid fire.
Chris Bennion

We know that how information is being communicated and paid for is quickly changing and that because of this the field of journalism is in a state of flux. But what does this exactly mean for today’s reporters and a public that wants to be informed?

A new play in the Seattle area explores how “instant information” through texting and tweeting is affecting the way news is covered and consumed here in the Northwest. It’s called “The New, New News…a Living Newspaper."

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