John Kessler

All Blues Host

John has worked as a professional bassist for 20 years, including a 15 year stint as Musical Director of the Mountain Stage radio program. John has been at KPLU since 1999 where he hosts “All Blues”, is producer of the BirdNote radio program, and co-hosts “Record Bin Roulette”. John is also the recording engineer for KPLU “In-Studio Performances”. Not surprisingly, John's main musical interests are jazz and blues, and he is still performing around Seattle.

His most memorable and satisfying KPLU radio moment was getting an email from Jimmy Lane, a bluesman and the son of blues legend Jimmy Rogers, who said something like “You’re playing the good stuff, keep it up!”

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Behind The Beat
5:00 am
Tue July 1, 2014

How Jaco Pastorius Launched A One-Man Revolution On The Bass

Jaco Pastorius strums his bass guitar at Avery Fisher Hall in New York on June 28, 1982.
Rene Perez AP Photo

You probably know “Birdland” by the group Weather Report well enough to sing along with the melody.

What you may not know is the melody is being played on an electric bass by Jaco Pastorius, the subject of today’s discussion.  

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Behind The Beat
5:00 am
Tue June 3, 2014

Rebellion Of The Sidemen, Or The Birth Of Be-Bop

FILE - Jazz trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie is seen during the Boston Globe Jazz and Blues Festival in Boston, Jan. 15, 1966.
Bob Daugherty AP Photo

Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker’s song “Ko-Ko” is perhaps one of the most important American recordings of all time. It’s widely considered to be the first be-bop song ever to be recorded. And even though it’s a 1945 recording, this is still the template for modern jazz.

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Behind The Beat
5:00 am
Tue May 6, 2014

The Road To Fame: How Jimi Hendrix Rose From The 'Chitlin' Circuit' To Become An Icon

In this 1970 file photo, Jimi Hendrix performs on the Isle of Wight in England.
AP Photo

When Jimi Hendrix released the song “Foxy Lady” as part of the “Are You Experienced” album in 1967, it was like this whole package of psychedelia had dropped from the sky.

It came out of nowhere. Many had never heard music that sounded like this, or even of Hendrix, for that matter.

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Behind The Beat
5:00 am
Tue April 1, 2014

Here's The Man To Thank For The Sound Of The Harmonica As We Know It

Wikimedia Commons

The song “Juke” by Little Walter Jacobs might not sound revolutionary to modern ears, but when it first came out in 1951, nobody had ever had heard harmonica played like this — ever. It really has an aggressive, in-your-face sound.

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Behind The Beat
5:00 am
Tue March 4, 2014

This, We Agree, Was The First-Ever Recorded Rock And Roll Song

John Lee Hooker
Stevesworldofphotos Flickr

What was the first recorded rock and roll song?

Before we can answer that question, we have to go back and figure out the ingredients of rock and roll. We can identify three most important ingredients: gospel, jump and blues. 

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Blues Time Machine
12:00 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

The long flight of Muddy's 'Honey Bee'

Muddy Waters

The Blues Time Machine

Muddy Waters was born in rural Mississippi, and learned his blues at the feet of Son House and Robert Johnson.

By the 1940’s he took that delta blues to Chicago and led the gradual transition to electrified urban blues. He then recorded “Honey Bee” in 1951 with just bass and guitar accompaniment. The sound was closer to the delta, but you can hear the beginnings of the more aggressive modern sound starting to happen.

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Blues Time Machine
12:00 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Hendrix inspired by Earl King's 'Come On'

Earl King

The Blues Time Machine

Earl King is one of the great songwriters and performers to come out of New Orleans, and his legacy continues to live on. Many of his compositions, including “Big Chief," “Trick Bag” and “These Lonely, Lonely Nights” have become an important part of the New Orleans “songbook."

His 1960 recording of “Come On Pts. 1 & 2” is punctuated with many starts and stops, featuring his expressive voice and aggressive and precise guitar work. If you look through Jimi Hendrix’s early releases, there are only a handful of songs among the dozens that he did not write. Earl King’s “Come On” is one of those.

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Blues Time Machine
12:00 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

'Black Rat' comes from the most powerful singer to walk the Earth

Big Mama Thornton

The Blues Time Machine

The urban blues of places like Detroit and Chicago came from country blues. Little Son Joe and his better known partner Memphis Minnie were among the players who brought the blues to the cities, paving the way for Muddy Waters and others who would follow.

Memphis Minnie is known as one of the best guitarists and singers in the blues, and had a prolific career lasting 40 years. She married Little Son Joe (Ernest Lawlars) in the late 1930’s and they recorded “Black Rat Swing” in 1941 with Joe on vocals.

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Best Of 2013
1:00 pm
Thu December 26, 2013

10 Artists You Should Have Known In 2013

Trampled Under Foot
Courtesy of the artist

It's usually easy to keep up with your favorite artists. You can follow them on Twitter, like them on Facebook and check them out when they come to your town.

Falling in love with unfamiliar bands? That's not quite as simple. There are so many aspiring musicians out there, you can't possibly listen to all of them.

But a few lucky people get to listen to random new artists for a living, including public radio hosts. So we asked NPR stations around the country to highlight their favorite musical discoveries of the year. The results ranged from a Pulitzer Prize winner to stars of the Kansas City BBQ circuit.

Read on for more about the 10 artists you should have known in 2013.

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Jazz and Blues
7:01 am
Sat December 14, 2013

John Kessler’s Top 10 Blues Albums Of 2013

FILE - Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks perform with the Tedeschi Trucks Band at the Newport Jazz Festival in Newport, R.I.
Joe Goblin Associated Press

Boz Scaggs: Memphis (429 Records)

A tribute to the Memphis soul-blues tradition, made with some of the city’s best players. His unique rasp has only improved with age, and perfectly complements the laid-back groove that permeates the release. Not all the material is “soul” music, some of the best tracks are the bluesy “Cadillac Walk” and “Dry Spell”. Boz is a master of the simmering blues vibe, slightly restrained, but overflowing with mojo.

James Cotton: Cotton Mouth Man (Alligator Records)

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Blues Time Machine
7:00 am
Sat December 14, 2013

'Cold Shot,' Stevie Ray Vaughan's real Texas Shuffle

Stevie Ray Vaughan
Scott Newton

Stevie Ray Vaughan almost single-handedly brought blues to the mainstream in the 1980’s and 90’s with over a dozen Billboard singles and four Grammy awards. He’ll always be considered one of the most original guitar players of all time.

Though musically untrained, he was an astute student of the blues, and much of what he popularized is built on the work of his fellow Texas bluesmen.

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Blues Time Machine
12:00 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

Everybody's got the 'Fever,' but Peggy Lee's got it bad

Little WIllie John

Listen to The Blues Time Machine

Chances are you’ve heard Peggy Lee’s iconic version of “Fever”– it’s one of the steamiest love songs ever written. But the original recording was released two years earlier by Little Willie John in 1956.

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Blues Time Machine
12:00 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

'Kokomo Blues' Among the Roots of 'Sweet Home Chicago'

Blues Time Machine

“Sweet Home Chicago” is one of the best known blues songs ever written. But historians seem to agree that when Robert Johnson recorded the song in 1936, he borrowed heavily to make his masterpiece.

“Kokomo Blues” is clearly one of the building blocks of that better known blues song. Scrapper Blackwell came out with it in 1928.

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Blues Time Machine
12:00 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Following "Blues With a Feeling" through cutting-edge changes

Little Walter

Here’s a perfect example of a song that changed with the times, and was at the cutting edge of those changes.

Drummer and singer Rabon Tarrant recorded “Blues With a Feeling” in 1947, a time when big band swing music was in transition to rock and roll. This version straddles both genres with the beat of rock and roll, but the more jazzy instrumentation of piano, sax and trumpet.

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Blues Time Machine
12:00 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Robert Johnson at the Crossroads represents Delta blues the best

Robert Johnson, circa 1935.
Hooks Brothers

The Blues Time Machine

If I had to pick one person to represent Delta blues at the peak of its expression, it would be Robert Johnson.

Saying that he was a superlative guitar player, impassioned singer and masterful lyricist seems barely adequate to convey the importance of the work he accomplished in his 27 years. Many of his songs became not only blues standards but would be a huge influence on rock music.

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