KPLU

News articles from KPLU

Pages

Climate change
3:00 pm
Mon August 20, 2012

Dash of salt in clouds may fight global warming, UW scientist says

John McNeill, via UW News

By Todd Bishop of Geekwire

A group of scientists, including a University of Washington atmospheric physicist, wants to test the theory that pumping sea salt into the sky over the ocean would combat global warming by creating clouds that reflect more sunlight back into space.

Read more
Washington wildfires
12:40 pm
Mon August 20, 2012

Taylor Bridge fire 47 percent contained; donations surge

This photo combination shows a house on a hillside above Bettas Road near Cle Elum, Wash., surrounded by flames on Aug. 14, top, and on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2012, bottom. the house survived the fire because of the defensible space around the structure.
The Associated Press

CLE ELUM, Wash. – Firefighters are hoping to reach containment Tuesday on a fire that has burned dozens of homes east of the Cascades.

Read more
Humanosphere
1:50 pm
Tue July 3, 2012

'ChangeMaker' uses business enterprise to promote public health

Erin Larsen-Cooper, 29, is a program associate withVillageReach, and a graduate of the University of Washington and Western Washington University.

By Lisa Stiffler, Humanosphere correspondent

In wealthy countries, it’s no problem for an organization to provide a single, narrowly defined service. In a poor community, it won’t always work to focus on singular goal, ignoring the existing challenges that can doom even the most well-intentioned projects.

Enter Erin Larsen-Cooper, a recent graduate of the University of Washington. She's hopeful that programs that are more holistic, that work with existing health programs and employ members of the community that they’re aiming to help, will get us closer to solving some of the problems in global health and poverty.

Read more on Humanosphere.

Jazz & Blues
8:55 am
Tue May 29, 2012

KPLU School of Jazz is back in session

Several of Western Washington’s finest high school jazz bands and jazz professionals are showcased on KPLU School of Jazz-Volume 8, the station’s latest CD release which is the culmination of this year’s mentoring project.

Buy your copy of KPLU School of Jazz now

Read more
Seattle pro sports
2:57 pm
Wed May 23, 2012

Study counters Seattle Port's claims against new NBA arena

Chris Hansen's bid to build a new NBA stadium in Seattle got a boosts from new traffic study.
KPLU

A study has found that Seattle's SoDo neighborhood can handle the traffic that may come from building a third sports arena in the area.

The study was released Wednesday by the City of Seattle and paid for by Chris Hansen, the developer who wants to build an 18,000-seat facility that could house an NBA and an NHL franchise near where the Mariners and Seahawks play.

Read more
Humanosphere
5:37 pm
Mon May 21, 2012

Can spiders fight malaria? UW students think so

Univeristy of Washington student propose using native African spiders to prey on mosquitoes who transmit malaria.

By Cyan James, Humanosphere correspondent

A fresh crop of Changemakers has been identified by the Washington Global Health Alliance’s Be the Change student competition. Among the three first place winners was a group of UW students who want to enlist a spider to fight malaria ...

Read more on Humanosphere.

Sanity in Seattle
12:20 pm
Mon May 21, 2012

8 simple rules for staying sane in Seattle (now the rain is back)

Hey, don't lose your cool the way Mount St. Helens did ... and don't worry too much about the next great disaster!
The Associated Press

With the spring rains descending upon us, ushering in the "June Gloom" a little early, Crosscut.com's Knute Berger has come up with eight simple rules to preserve your sanity while living in Seattle.

Read more
Humanosphere
1:40 pm
Thu May 10, 2012

Can organic farming feed Africa?

“This is not an argument that organic can or cannot feed the world,” said John Reganold, regents professor of Soil Science and Agroecology at Washington State University in Pullman. “No one system can feed the world.”
CIAT International Center for Tropical Agriculture

By Lisa Stiffler, special correspondent

When you consider that one in seven people worldwide will go to bed tonight hungry, it does seem fair to ask: Can organic deliver the goods for the developing world?

New research says yes – but not everywhere and not for everything.

Read more on Humanosphere.

Environment
5:16 pm
Wed May 9, 2012

Herbicide use on commercial timber lands questioned

Eron King of Blachly, Oregon says herbicide sprayed on forested ridge tops makes its way down to people and animals below.
Serene Fang Center for Investigative Reporting

Radio Transcript:

GELLERMAN: It's Living on Earth, I'm Bruce Gellerman. Oregon is timber country.
The terrain is steep, dark green, and intensely beautiful. Six million acres of Oregon forest is owned by commercial timber companies. The companies spray the land with herbicide when the trees are young. It’s an efficient way to kill every other plant except for the commercially valuable Douglas fir.

Read more
Weather with Cliff Mass
10:16 am
Fri May 4, 2012

NW spring weather has made us crabby for ... well ... a long time

Early Steilacoom - residents then were anxious to see the sun on a regular basis as we are.

Today, KPLU's weather expert Cliff Mass and science reporter Keith Seinfeld touch on the forecast – cloudy through most of Saturday, then getting better through Monday – and then take up a common thread throughout NW weather history: grousing.

Here's a weather report from 1855 published in the Puget Sound Courier:

"Well, March went out, April came in, and with it, cold, wet, disagreeable weather, and a universal spirit of discontent, and a disposition to 'growl'"

"Throughout the entire month, and even up to this, the last day of May, it has been precisely the same, and some amongst us profess to be so thoroughly disgusted with the weather .... that they threaten to leave the Territory altogether."

Read more
Humanosphere
4:30 am
Thu May 3, 2012

Smallpox eradicator, Medal of Freedom winner - Bill Foege talks with KPLU

Bill Foege discusses his address to the 3rd plenary session of the 53rd World Health Organization's General Assembly in 2000.
The Associated Press

One of the northwest’s best kept secrets is a person. He’s Bill Foege, a physician and Northwest native, who recently received the Presidential Medal of Freedom.  

Foege went to Nigeria and figured out how to eradicate smallpox – the only human disease ever wiped off the planet. He also ran the nation’s top public health agency, the CDC. More recently, he helped shape the mission of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Tom Paulson, of KPLU's Humanosphere blog, sat down with Bill Foege at his Vashon home to learn more about why people from Seattle are such a force globally. Click the listen button above to hear the interview.

Read Tom Paulson's first-person take on Bill Foege's life and work on Humanosphere.

Humanosphere
10:56 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Infectious hope: When getting malaria makes sense

Now in its 36th year, Seattle BioMed grows its own mosquitoes, investigates malaria in mouse models, runs a series of research labs, and recruits volunteers for human trials.
Cyan James

By Cyan James, Humanosphere correspondent

Despite the potential annoyances—hours spent being screened , frequent health checks, irritating bites, painful twice-daily blood draws for weeks, not to mention the slamming headaches and vicious chills of malaria itself—people like Rasberry say being a malaria trials volunteer is worth it.

Read more on Humanosphere.

Pike Place Market Remodel
2:13 pm
Fri April 27, 2012

Photos: Behind the scenes of Pike Place Market's $69M remodel

You can't actually see most of the work that was done on Pike Place Market's $69-million, three-year remodel. It involved a lot of plumbing, wiring, and seismic upgrades. Under the floorboards, inside the walls, and deep in the basements, the bones and nerves of the market were undergoing radical surgery.

Here's a slide-show of snapshots taken by the construction team:

Jazz & Blues
1:22 pm
Wed April 25, 2012

5 videos celebrating Ella Fitzgerald’s birthday

Louis Armstrong, left, makes a guest appearance as Ella Fitzgerald opens at the Empire Room of the Waldorf Astoria in New York City, March 30, 1971.
AP Photo

Known as the "First Lady of Jazz" singer Ella Fitzgerald was born April 25, 1917, in Newport News, Virginia.

From rather humble beginnings Fitzgerald and her smooth, silky voice climbed to the top of the jazz world, reports Biography.com. During her long career she worked with greats from Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong to Dizzy Gillespie and Frank Sinatra. In all Ella recorded over 200 albums and around 2,000 songs in her lifetime. She died on June 15, 1996.

Here’s five videos celebrating the great singers career:

Read more
Diversions
10:56 am
Mon April 23, 2012

Take 'a walk' around the world ... from space!

If you're into images of Earth taken from space, NASA has a new video for you.

Pages