Linton Weeks

Linton Weeks joined NPR in the summer of 2008, as its national correspondent for Digital News. He immediately hit the campaign trail, covering the Democratic and Republican National Conventions; fact-checking the debates; and exploring the candidates, the issues and the electorate.

Weeks is originally from Tennessee, and graduated from Rhodes College in 1976. He was the founding editor of Southern Magazine in 1986. The magazine was bought — and crushed — in 1989 by Time-Warner. In 1990, he was named managing editor of The Washington Post's Sunday magazine. Four years later, he became the first director of the newspaper's website, Washingtonpost.com. From 1995 until 2008, he was a staff writer in the Style section of The Washington Post.

He currently lives in a suburb of Washington with the artist Jan Taylor Weeks. In 2009, they created The Stone and Holt Weeks Foundation to honor their beloved sons.

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The Protojournalist
1:37 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Freedom To NOT Celebrate Independence Day

Abolitionist Frederick Douglass.
Library of Congress

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 11:41 am

Celebrating Independence Day on July Fourth is as American as burgers and dogs on the grill, lemonade in plastic cups, apple pie on paper plates, baseball, fireworks and Sousa marches.

Except for those Americans who don't celebrate it at all.

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The Protojournalist
12:10 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Why America May Be Ready For Some Futbol

William West AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 12:07 pm

Ante-millennium America was ho-hum about soccer as a sport, because it is a game with: nonstop motion, international players, loose rules and corruption, low expectations of scoring and an imprecise ending.

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The Protojournalist
10:01 am
Tue June 17, 2014

A Native American Take On Tornadoes

1904-05. Red Stone Church Built Winter
Courtesy of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Musuem of Natural History, University of Oklahoma

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 4:50 am

While tornadoes continue to tear across America's midsection — taking lives and destroying property — we continue to search for explanations of the phenomenon, in hopes of developing better warning systems and protection.

But after decades of research, funded by decamillions of dollars, the fundamentals of wind funnels remain somewhat mysterious.

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The Protojournalist
10:09 am
Wed June 4, 2014

Should There Be A University Of Politics?

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 4:07 pm

In France, many high-level politicians — such as Prime Ministers Francois Hollande, Jacques Chirac and Valery Giscard d'Estaing — developed their statecraft skills at the Ecole Nationale d'Administration.

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The Protojournalist
10:10 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Bewildered By Bilderberg

An anti-surveillance protester stands outside the Bilderberg conference last year in Watford, England. This year the conference may be in Denmark.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 24, 2014 6:10 am

The Bilderberg annual conference is convening at the end of May in Denmark. Or so it's reported.

For folks who have never heard of Bilderberg, it's an invitation-only confab of high-powered people who jawbone about world issues. Its mission, according to its official website, is at once simple and complex: "to foster dialogue between Europe and North America."

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The Protojournalist
11:34 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Tweet Suits: Social Media And The Law

Levent Konuk istockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 6:29 am

In the past several years, as more and more people are connected through more and more social media, the idea of turning personal grievances into class actions has been popping up, well, more and more.

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The Protojournalist
12:06 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Google Frecking: The Week In Pandas

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 6:30 am

What a week it's been for giant pandas. We know because for the past seven days, we have been Google Frecking for pandas.

Google Frecking is an info-gathering game we devised — at the suggestion of our creative editor — for drilling a little deeper into a subject that intrigues us. In this case: pandas.

Last weekend we set up a Google Alert for pandas. We directed Google to send us news about pandas "when it happens" and we asked for "all results."

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The Protojournalist
11:23 am
Mon April 14, 2014

The Grumpy Point: When A Man Turns 70

istockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 7:39 am

The approximate moment when grumpiness kicks in for men, according to a recently released report, is around age 70.

Then you'd better get off his lawn.

Researchers found that as men grow older — from, say, 50 on — they have fewer obstacles and annoyances to worry about in life and, furthermore, they are more equipped to deal with adversity. But around age 70, life — or at least the perception of happiness — begins to go downhill.

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The Protojournalist
11:23 am
Mon April 14, 2014

The Grumpy Point: When A Man Turns 70

istockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 7:39 am

The approximate moment when grumpiness kicks in for men, according to a recently released report, is around age 70.

Then you'd better get off his lawn.

Researchers found that as men grow older — from, say, 50 on — they have fewer obstacles and annoyances to worry about in life and, furthermore, they are more equipped to deal with adversity. But around age 70, life — or at least the perception of happiness — begins to go downhill.

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The Protojournalist
9:54 am
Fri April 11, 2014

4 Strange Sports In America's Past

IFP istockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 7:39 am

In recent pursuits, we have come upon accounts of once-practiced — and somewhat, shall we say, curious — sports that have long since faded into obscurity.

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The Protojournalist
9:49 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Truth-Seeking In The Age Of Speculation

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 7:38 am

The marvel-filled Information Age is also turning out to be the muddled-up Epoch of Conjecture. The Era of Error.

Seemingly, we know everything. What is not in Wikipedia can be found through Google. And what Google can't scrape up, the National Security Agency — or international hackers — can. Through crowdsourcing, we can solve crimes and answer questions.

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The Protojournalist
9:09 am
Tue April 1, 2014

5 April Fools' Pranks Gone Bad

Yanik Chauvin istockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 4:25 pm

Perhaps in a calmer, more innocent era — if there ever was such a thing — April Fools' jokes made more sense. Nowadays the world seems overrun with Impractical Jokers, Crank Yankers and Ali G-type tricksters. And gags that once might have made us smile make us just, well, gag.

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The Protojournalist
8:38 am
Wed March 26, 2014

What Winter Will Be Like In 100 Years

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 2:57 pm

One of the upsides to the seemingly endless winter of 2014 was that you had time to think.

And to ask futuristic questions, such as: What will the American Winter of 2114 be like?

Here are some of the answers.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Sat March 22, 2014

American Libraries Learn To Read Teenagers

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 2:12 pm

Way, way back in the 20th century, American teenagers turned to the local public library as a great good place to hang out. It was a hotspot for meeting up, and sharing thoughts with, other like-minded people – in books and in the flesh. It was a wormhole in the universe that gave us tunnels into the past and into the future. It was a quiet spot in an ever-noisier world.

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The Protojournalist
12:42 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

FootGolf: A New Sport Explored In 19 Questions

A FootGolfer, in argyle socks.
Courtesy of the AFGL

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 8:13 am

Springtime. And our thoughts turn to Augusta and lush green courses and a tradition unlike any other.

No not The Masters tournament — FootGolf.

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