Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
11:00 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Putin: Russia To Upgrade Nuclear Forces In Response To West

Russian President Vladimir Putin leaves the Life-giving Trinity church in Moscow, on Wednesday. Putin accused NATO of using the Ukraine crisis to "resuscitate itself."
RIA NOVOSTI Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 10:52 am

Vladmir Putin, whose annexation of Crimea and involvement in the conflict in eastern Ukraine have drawn plenty of comparisons in the West to his Cold War predecessors, is not going to calm any nerves with his latest pronouncement: Russia has begun development of new nuclear weapons.

Speaking at a Kremlin meeting on weapons modernization plans, Russia's president said the West had been "warned many times that we would have to take corresponding countermeasures to ensure our security" in light of U.S. missile defense plans.

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The Two-Way
10:26 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Government To Drop Background Check Firm USIS

Edward Snowden, who leaked thousands of classified documents pertaining to U.S. electronic surveillance activities, was one of the federal workers vetted and cleared by USIS.
AP

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 11:59 am

Update at 10:30 a.m. ET.

The Office of Personnel Management is severing its ties with a private contractor that provides many of the security background checks for the U.S. government after the company was hit by a cyberattack last month that compromised the files of thousands of federal workers.

The OPM said late Tuesday that "following a careful and comprehensive review," it had decided not to renew its contracts with Falls Church, Va.-based USIS.

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The Two-Way
9:33 am
Tue September 9, 2014

Scientists Doubt That Meteor Caused Crater In Nicaragua

A handout picture provided by Nicaraguan Army on Monday shows the place where what was first reported as a meteorite fell close to International Airport Augusto Sandino, in Managua, Nicaragua.
Nicaraguan Army/ Handout EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 9, 2014 8:09 am

We reported on Monday that a meteor, thought possibly to be a chunk of an Earth-passing asteroid, was the cause of a 40-foot crater outside the international airport in the Nicaraguan capital.

But astronomers and NASA scientists are now casting doubt on that possibility. The biggest mystery is that no one so far has reported seeing a flash of light in the sky that would be expected to accompany such a meteor strike.

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The Two-Way
1:53 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Poroshenko, On Visit To East, Vows Mariupol Will Stay Ukrainian

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko speaks during his visit to Ilich Iron and Steel Works in the southern coastal town of Mariupol on Monday. The city has been surrounded by pro-Russia separatists.
Vasily Fedosenko Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 11:33 am

Updated at 1:00 p.m. ET

Ukraine's president, on a visit to embattled Mariupol in the country's east, proclaimed "this city was, is and will be Ukrainian."

Petro Poroshenko, in a fiery speech in the city, which has been surrounded for days by pro-Russia separatists, also said that 1,200 Ukrainian POWs had been handed over under the terms of a cease-fire that went into effect on Friday.

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The Two-Way
9:45 am
Mon September 8, 2014

Meteor Leaves 40-Foot Crater Near Managua's Airport

A photo released by the Nicaraguan army shows an impact crater made by a small meteorite in a wooded area near Managua's international airport and an air force base.
AP

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 8:52 am

Updated at 11:45 p.m. ET

There was an unexpected crash landing near the international airport in the Nicaraguan capital over the weekend, but luckily no one was hurt: A small meteor, thought to have broken off from an Earth-passing asteroid, left a 40-foot-wide crater.

The meteorite — which experts say may have disintegrated on impact — smashed through a wooded area outside the airport in Managua, leaving a 16-foot-deep hole.

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The Two-Way
2:09 pm
Sat August 30, 2014

U.N. Peacekeepers Rescued After Being Trapped By Syrian Militants

Smoke rises near a Syrian flag hoisted up a flagpole as a result of the fighting between Syrian rebels and the Syrian Army over the control of Quneitra crossing, on Saturday. The area is where dozens of U.N. peacekeepers had been under siege by Nusra Front fighters.
Atef Safadi EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 11:39 am

Dozens of besieged United Nations peacekeepers were safely extracted after being surrounded for days on the Syrian side of the Golan Heights.

After rebels of the al-Qaida-affiliated Nusra Front seized 44 Fijian peacekeepers on Thursday, they laid siege to two encampments of Filipino peacekeepers totaling more than 70 soldiers.

The rebels demanded the Filipino soldiers, part of the U.N. mission known as UNDOF, surrender their weapons, but the peacekeepers refused.

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The Two-Way
2:07 pm
Sat August 30, 2014

Michael Sam, First Openly Gay NFL Draft, Is Dropped By Rams

St. Louis Rams draft pick Michael Sam watches pregame festivities before the start of the South Dakota State-Missouri NCAA college football game on Saturday, in Columbia, Mo. Sam, the first openly gay player drafted by an NFL team, was released by the St. Louis Rams Saturday.
L.G. Patterson AP

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 3:07 pm

Update at 6 p.m. ET

Michael Sam, the first openly gay player drafted to an NFL team, has been released by the St. Louis Rams, the team has announced.

ESPN.com writes:

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The Two-Way
9:57 am
Fri August 29, 2014

Malaysia Airlines Cuts A Third Of Its Workforce After Steep Losses

A Malaysia Airlines crew member inspects an airplane at Kuala Lumpur International Airport on Thursday. The carrier announced it was laying off a third of its workforce amid steep financial losses.
Azhar Rahim EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 10:14 am

For Malaysia Airlines, the tragic loss of two of its aircraft with all passengers and crew in recent months has hardly been the extent of its problems: On Thursday, the carrier announced a steep quarterly loss, and today came word that it is cutting nearly a third of its workforce.

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The Two-Way
12:23 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Scientists Study How We Evolved To Stand On Our Own Two Fins

Researchers raised two groups of walking, air-breathing Polypterus senegalus — one on land and one on the water. They discovered that each group was able to adapt to be best suited to its environment.
A. Morin, E.M. Standen, T.Y. Du, H. Larsson McGill University

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 12:18 pm

Scientists examining an unusual African fish that can walk and breathe air think they've learned a thing or two about how our distant ancestors made the leap from the oceans to terra firma some 400 million years ago.

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The Two-Way
11:23 am
Thu August 28, 2014

China Warns U.S. Over Surveillance Flights

This handout photo provided by the Office of the Defense Secretary (OSD), taken Aug. 19, 2014, shows a Chinese fighter jet that the White House said Friday conducted a "dangerous intercept" of a U.S. Navy surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 7:59 am

Beijing has rejected U.S. claims that one of its fighter jets acted recklessly in intercepting a U.S. Navy maritime patrol plane in the South China Sea last week, warning Washington to curtail or discontinue "close surveillance" flights near Chinese territory.

"According to different situations we will adopt different measures to make sure we safeguard our air and sea security of the country," Defense Ministry spokesman Yang Yujun said at a news briefing.

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The Two-Way
7:41 pm
Sun August 24, 2014

Ebola Outbreak Emerges In Central Africa

An Ebola quarantine area in Monrovia, Liberia, on Sunday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 5:29 am

Two Ebola-related deaths have emerged in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the country's health ministry says. If confirmed, it would be the first time in the present outbreak that the disease has killed outside of a handful of West African nations.

But Congo Health Minister Felix Kabange Numbi insists that the two of eight fever victims that tested positive for Ebola are part of a separate outbreak from the one that has killed more than 1,400 people in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria.

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The Two-Way
1:42 pm
Sun August 24, 2014

State Of Emergency Declared After Quake Rocks Northern Calif.

A photo provided by Lyall Davenport shows damage to a building in Napa, Calif., early Sunday.
Lyall Davenport AP

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 4:50 am

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

Calif. Gov. Jerry Brown has made an emergency declaration after a strong 6.0-magnitude earthquake rocked northern California, causing dozens of injuries, damaged buildings and power outages. The quake struck at 3:20 a.m. PT, the U.S. Geological Survey says.

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The Two-Way
12:15 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

Chinese Fighter Buzzed U.S. Navy Plane In 'Dangerous Intercept'

A U.S. Navy P-8 Poseidon aircraft takes off from Perth International Airport during the search for Malaysia Airlines MH370. The same general type of aircraft was involved in a "dangerous intercept" by a Chinese fighter jet earlier this week off Hainan island.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 12:25 pm

Update at 2:20 p.m. ET

A Chinese fighter jet conducted what is being describing as a "dangerous intercept" of a U.S. Navy P-8 Poseidon in international waters off the island of Hainan in the South China Sea earlier this week, the Pentagon confirms.

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The Two-Way
12:11 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

White House: Islamic State Has 'Gained Capacity' In Recent Months

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 12:24 pm

Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes says the beheading of an American journalist by Islamic State militants this week is tantamount to a terrorist attack on the United States and that it comes as the al-Qaida-inspired extremist group has "gained capacity in the last several months."

In response to a question from a reporter at an afternoon briefing, Rhodes said the U.S. sees the killing of journalist James Foley "as an attack on America," adding that Washington is "moving heaven and earth to find and bring home American hostages" held captive in the region.

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The Two-Way
9:43 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Eggs, Milk And Ink: Venezuela Wants All Supermarket Shoppers Fingerprinted

Government-subsidized goods at a state-run market in Caracas, Venezuela, in 2012. Smuggling of cheap groceries into neighboring Colombia is so rampant that the government plans to fingerprint shoppers.
Fernando Llano AP

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 8:46 am

Attention Venezuelan shoppers: Please proceed to the supermarket checkout for fingerprinting.

That could be a reality if a plan announced earlier this week by the country's president, Nicolas Maduro, goes into effect.

The purpose? Combating shortages caused by rampant smuggling of subsidized food in Venezuela across the border into neighboring Colombia. Maduro says the system would stop people from buying too much of a single item.

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