The Two-Way
8:07 am
Thu May 31, 2012

'We Could See This Coming,' Brother Says Of Man ID'd In Seattle Killings

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 7:30 am

The man who reportedly shot and killed five people Wednesday in Seattle, before taking his own life, changed about five years ago into a mentally ill individual who was "really angry toward everything," his brother tells The Seattle Times.

"It's no surprise to me this happened," Andrew Stawicki told the Times. "We could see this coming. Nothing good is going to come with that much anger inside of you."

The Times, citing numerous sources including Andrew Stawicki and the owner of the cafe where the killings began, is identifying the gunman as Ian Stawicki, 40, of the Magnolia neighborhood in Seattle.

Seattle Police have not yet officially released the gunman's name.

According to the Times, Andrew Stawicki said his family "long hoped Ian would go to mental-health treatment or take medication to keep his moods in balance. But, he said, "someone like that is so stubborn you can't talk to him."

We're also learning more about some of the victims (two of those killed have yet to be identified). The Times says:

-- Drew Keriakedes, who died, was a performer in "Circus Contraption, a vaudeville-burlesque group." He was 45.

-- Joe "Vito" Albanese, 52, was a bass player in punk bands and vaudeville acts, who lived in the basement of Keriakedes' home. He also died. Albanese and Keriakedes played with a band called God's Favorite Beefcake. They were shot at Cafe Racer, where the rampage began.

-- Gloria Koch Leonidas, also 52, "was a married mother of two girls who was active in the lighting industry." She was shot and killed at a nearby parking lot where Stawicki allegedly fled after leaving the cafe.

-- Leonard Meuse, who survived being shot in the jaw and armpit, was a chef at the Cafe Racer. Meuse, 46, "majored in Japanese and zoology at the University of Washington."

Our colleagues at KPLU are also following the news.

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