allergies

health and schools
5:01 am
Thu April 25, 2013

Help coming to protect students with allergies

Nurses, teachers and other school staff will likely have more flexibility next fall to give adrenaline shots if a student goes into allergic shock. Both houses of the Legislature have unanimously approved a bill that loosens restrictions on how and when schools can use an epinephrine injector. 

The change is meant to save the lives of kids who have a severe allergy, including some rare cases in which the first-ever reaction to a not-yet-diagnosed allergy takes place at school or on a field trip.

Read more
allergic reactions
11:11 am
Fri February 8, 2013

Proposal would make adrenaline shots more readily available

During a severe allergic reaction, this common brand of epinephrine injector could save a life
EpiPen

The idea of putting a needle of adrenaline into someone might seem intimidating – but that’s how you save their life if they’re in allergic shock. The legislature is considering empowering school staff to give injections more widely.

Last year, a girl in Virginia died after eating a peanut given to her by a friend.

Read more
Food
6:20 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Experimental treatment for peanut allergies debated

Josh Kenzer Flickr

Peanut allergies have been rising dramatically – enough so that many elementary classrooms have banned peanuts. About four times as many children have peanut allergies today as 20 years ago.

The severe form of peanut allergies can be deadly, which is why thousands of people must carry around an adrenaline shot (called an epinephrine pen, or "epi-pen").

Now, allergy doctors are debating whether they should offer an experimental allergy treatment. It was a topic this past weekend, at the 2012 Northwest Allergy Forum in Seattle.

Read more
Health
4:10 pm
Mon May 7, 2012

Don't curse the rain, it depresses allergens

Pollen from a variety of common plants. The image is magnified by about 500x, so the bean shaped grain in the bottom left corner is about 50 μm long. Photo by Dartmouth Electron Microscope Facility, Dartmouth College

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 3:15 pm

Here in the Northwest, you hear lots of complaints about the abundant rain. But this year's cool March weather and above normal rainfall in April may have eased the suffering of people with pollen allergies.

Washington State Climatologist Nick Bond had a personal reason to investigate the correlation between rainfall and pollen.

"I suffer from allergies to alder and birch," he says. "I noticed that when I am usually sneezing and sniffling in mid to late March, there wasn't much of that this year."

Read more