Arts

Arts
4:22 am
Mon December 3, 2012

Archivists may want your old film, meeting in Seattle to talk about it

Hannah Palin, a film archives specialist at the University of Washington, hard at work. Archivists are meeting in Seattle this week.
KPLU News

Capturing and playing back video of your kid’s first steps or a few minutes of concert footage is almost too easy with smart phones. The immediacy kind of makes you forget how much effort it was to break out the Super Eight camera and project it later in your living room. 

This week as the Association of Moving Image Archivists hold their annual convention in Seattle, we are reminded that sometimes there is value in hanging on to outmoded technology. Hear to KPLU’s Monica Spain story by clicking the listen button above.

NPR Books
7:10 am
Mon November 19, 2012

Book-Vending Machine Dispenses Suspense

Craig Small via Vimeo

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 2:53 pm

Earlier this year, Stephen Fowler, owner of The Monkey's Paw used-book store in Toronto, had an idea.

He wanted a creative way to offload his more ill-favored books — "old and unusual" all, as the store's motto goes — that went further than a $1 bin by the register.

It came in a conversation with his wife: a vending machine.

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NPR Books
5:58 am
Wed November 14, 2012

'Brain On Fire' Details An Out-Of-Mind Experience

Free Press

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 12:14 pm

It's a cold March night in New York, and journalist Susannah Cahalan is watching PBS with her boyfriend, trying to relax after a difficult day at work. He falls asleep, and wakes up moments later to find her having a seizure straight out of The Exorcist. "My arms suddenly whipped straight out in front of me, like a mummy, as my eyes rolled back and my body stiffened," Cahalan writes. "I inhaled repeatedly, with no exhale. Blood and foam began to spurt out of my mouth through clenched teeth."

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arts trouble
10:05 am
Mon November 12, 2012

Concerts canceled as Spokane symphony strikes

Musicians of the Spokane Symphony strike over salary cuts. Photo by Jessica Robinson

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 7:09 am

SPOKANE, Wash. - Classical musicians in Spokane stood outside their theater this weekend, lifting picket signs instead of instruments.

Musicians with the Spokane Symphony are entering week two of a strike over pay cuts. Five concerts have been canceled so far.

Spokane joins a growing list of cities this fall where symphonies have become embroiled in labor disputes -– including Seattle, Chicago, and Philadelphia.

Adam Wallstein is the principal timpanist with the Spokane Symphony.

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Arts
5:00 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Tracing Edward Curtis's steps with author Timothy Egan

Princess Angeline, the oldest and last surviving child of Chief Seattle
Edward Curtis Curtis Library, Northwestern University

If you've seen sepia images of Native American Indians, you've probably seen Edward Curtis's work.

A new biography, "Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher, The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis," pays tribute to the Seattle photographer. KPLU's Erin Hennessey walked around Seattle's Pioneer Square with  author Timothy Egan to see where Curtis took some of his early photos, including his first portrait of an American Indian, Princess Angeline, the last surviving child of Chief Seattle.

World's Fair Anniversary
5:18 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Update: The 'Trees' design wins Space Needle contest

The design that will adorn the top of the Space Needle.

The contest for designing the top of the Seattle Space Needle went from six choices to one - trees.

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The Picture Show
11:52 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Photos: Time-traveling in the Pacific Northwest

The caption for this photo in Edward Curtis' book reads: " ... a masked [Kwakiutl] man personating the thunderbird, dances with characteristic gestures as the canoe approaches the bride's village."
Edward Curtis Library of Congress

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 10:38 am

There's nothing like visiting a new landscape to spark the imagination. I just got back from a two-week road trip around the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. and Canada. And though it was my own country (the non-Canadian part, at least), it felt completely foreign to my eyes, which are accustomed to the swampy, lush Southeast.

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Justin Bieber in Tacoma
4:25 pm
Mon October 8, 2012

Not a 'Belieber' but your kid is? Options for tonight's Justin Bieber concert

Musician Justin Bieber performs during the Believe Tour at Staples Center on Oct. 2 in Los Angeles.
The Associated Press

Teen music sensation and hairstyle-trendsetter Justin Bieber will be singing in a sold-out Tacoma Dome on Tuesday night. That means something like 23,000 kids* will be dropped off by parents looking to while away a few hours.

Enter the LeMay – America’s Car Museum (ACM) and its “Parental Daycare.”

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NPR's watch this
9:02 am
Mon October 1, 2012

Watch This: Native American Author Sherman Alexie

Author and Spokane Indian Sherman Alexie won the American Book Award in 1996 for Reservation Blues.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 1:35 am

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Arts
5:28 am
Mon October 1, 2012

At Seattle Rep, a play about the Pullman Porters

"Pullman Porter Blues" at the Seattle Rep features a blues band, shown here in rehearsal.
Andry Laurence

Seattle Repertory Theatre opens its season Wednesday with a world premiere play about a group of African American workers known as the Pullman porters.

"Pullman Porter Blues" looks at three generations in one family of porters. The Pullman porters were former slaves who worked on a luxurious fleet of sleeper cars beginning in the late 19th century. Their descendants worked the trains up until the 1960s.

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Da Vinci mystery
9:15 am
Thu September 27, 2012

Could this be an early 'Mona Lisa?'

A closeup from the portrait that a Swiss foundation says is an early "Mona Lisa" by Leonard Da Vinci.
Denis Balibouse Landov

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 11:41 am

The Zurich-based Mona Lisa Foundation said today that it has evidence that a painting that first came to light in the late 1800s is an early "Mona Lisa" also done by Leonard Da Vinci.

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The Two-Way
9:58 am
Wed September 26, 2012

City Folk Are More Likely To Read This Post

Remember these? They're most important to those who live in small towns, a new survey shows.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 9:24 am

Reinforcing some things you might have suspected, the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism and Internet & American Life Project, along with the Knight Foundation, report today that a national telephone survey of adults finds:

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Photography
6:40 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Re-tracing the steps of a Civil War photographer on the anniversary of Antietam

Alexander Gardner captured the Confederate dead along the Hagerstown Pike at Antietam. One hundred fifty years later, sorghum lines what is now a paved road.
Todd Harrington and Alexander Gardner Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 10:31 am

Today's 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam got us thinking: What if Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner could revisit some of the original sites he photographed? If he used his equipment today, what would the images look like? That is: How have the landscapes changed — or stayed the same?

How These Work

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Books News & Features
8:43 pm
Sun September 16, 2012

A father's decades-old bedtime story is back in print

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 11:13 am

One night in 1947, an intensely curious 5-year-old boy named Michael McCleery asked his father for a story. So his father, William McCleery, produced a tale that revolved around a wolf named Waldo, a hen named Rainbow, and another little boy, the son of a farmer, named Jimmy Tractorwheel. Over weeks and weeks, William serialized the story, telling it in installments to Michael and his best friend during bedtimes and Sunday afternoon outings.

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Author Interviews
7:04 am
Tue September 11, 2012

Stories from a new generation of American soldiers

Yellow Birds book cover detail

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 6:57 am

Iraq War veteran Brian Castner opens his new memoir, The Long Walk, with a direct and disturbing warning:

"The first thing you should know about me is that I'm Crazy," he writes. "I haven't always been. Until that one day, the day I went Crazy, I was fine. Or I thought I was. Not anymore."

More than 10 years since a new generation of Americans went into combat, the soldiers themselves are starting to write the story of war. Three recent releases show how their experiences give them the authority to describe the war, fictionalize it and even satirize it.

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