Arts

Author Interviews
6:34 am
Mon September 10, 2012

'End of Men' heralds new era of female dominance

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 11:47 am

Women have fought tirelessly to establish equal footing for themselves in relationships, politics and the workplace, and according to writer Hanna Rosin, they've finally arrived.

In her new book, The End of Men: And The Rise of Women, Rosin argues that the U.S. has entered an era of female dominance.


Interview Highlights

On how the rise of women is largely an economic story

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Arts
1:56 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Why build a wall out of Jell-O?

Jell-O brick wall under construction at the Seattle Center grounds near the Monorail station.
Paula Wissel KPLU

Just steps away from the Monorail station at the Seattle Center, a wall is being constructed out of Jell-O.  A lightweight mortar holds the raspberry, orange and blackberry fusion "bricks" in place.   

The Jell-O brick wall is the work of sculptors Lisa Hein and Robert Seng. It was commissioned as part of the 50 year celebration of the Seattle World's Fair.

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The Two-Way
4:02 pm
Fri August 24, 2012

Jerry Nelson, Puppeteer For Sesame Street's Count Von Count, Is Dead

Jerry Nelson and the character he brought to life, Count von Count.
Larry Busacca Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 1:43 pm

Jerry Nelson, who voiced many characters on Sesame Street for more than 40 years, has died.

Nelson is perhaps best known because he brought Count von Count, the purple, friendly vampire, to life.

Madalit del Barco filed this obituary for our Newscast unit:

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Books
8:27 am
Fri August 24, 2012

Searching for 'Bernadette' in the wilds of Seattle

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 8:56 am

The narrator of Maria Semple's newest book, Where'd You Go, Bernadette, is 15-year-old Bee Fox. She's a nice kid, a good musician and a great student. In fact, she's such a great student that her parents have promised her anything she wants — and she chooses a family trip to Antarctica.

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World's Fair Anniversary
4:15 pm
Wed August 22, 2012

#topthis – Public to design the Space Needle’s top

Can you do this better? The Space Needle's owners want you to try.
The Associated Press

The roof of Seattle's iconic Space Needle was repainted on Tuesday with the message "top this" to promote a new contest in honor of the 50th anniversary of the 1962 World's Fair.

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The Two-Way
6:20 am
Fri August 17, 2012

Two-Year Prison Terms For Russia's Pussy Riot Rockers

Members of the all-girl punk band Pussy Riot: Nadezhda Tolokonnikova (right), Maria Alyokhina (center) and Yekaterina Samutsevich (left) in a glass-walled cage during a court hearing in Moscow earlier today.
Andrey Smirnov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 9:19 am

A Russian judge today found three members of the punk rock band Pussy Riot guilty of hooliganism connected to "religious hatred."

Word of the verdict came just before 7:30 a.m ET. Just before 10 a.m. ET, the judge announced that each woman was sentenced to serve two years in jail — the minimum that could be imposed.

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Arts
3:08 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

Seattle tattoo expo shows it's hard to stop at one

A Good Karma Body Art artist adding on to previous upper back tattoo.
Mallory Kaniss KPLU

Around 5,000 tattoo enthusiasts gathered at the Seattle Tattoo Expo this weekend to celebrate the art of tattooing, and maybe even get inked themselves. Tattoo artists completed more than 1,500 new tattoos throughout the weekend.

We saw a lot of people with multiple tattoos and that made us wonder: Once you get one tattoo, is it hard to stop?

"There's certainly an addictive quality to the whole process,” said Jeff Cornell, a tattoo artist.

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Arts
5:00 am
Thu August 9, 2012

How do you move a four-ton street clock?

A worker prepares Carroll's Clock for the move.
Lindsay Lowe KPLU

The Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) is in the process of moving from Seattle’s Montlake neighborhood to the Armory building in South Lake Union.

MOHAI has been around for nearly 60 years, and some people call it “Seattle’s attic.” It has a huge collection of historical objects from the Puget Sound region.

The museum has transported over 50,000 pieces already, and not all of them fit inside a box.

Here are just a few of the things they've moved:

- The first commercial Boeing airplane ever built

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Books
6:20 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Top 100 Teen Books

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 1:14 pm

More than 75,000 ballots were cast in our annual summer reader's survey — click here to see the full list of 100 books, complete with links and descriptions. Below is a printable list of the top 100 winners. And for even more great reads, check out the complete list of 235 finalists.

1. Harry Potter (series), by J.K. Rowling

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100 Best Books
6:20 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Your Favorites: 100 best-ever teen novels

Harriet Russell

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:50 am

It's almost a cliche at this point to say that teen fiction isn't just for teens anymore. Just last year, the Association of American Publishers ranked Children's/Young Adult books as the single fastest-growing publishing category.

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The Two-Way
8:14 am
Wed August 1, 2012

Gore Vidal, In Words

Gore Vidal in 1991. He died Tuesday, at the age of 86.
Central Press Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 4:16 am

The death of writer and cultural critic Gore Vidal on Tuesday, at the age of 86, means many are trying today to capture that man of words' life in just a few phrases:

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Remembrances
8:14 am
Wed August 1, 2012

Gore Vidal, American writer and cultural critic, dies

Author Gore Vidal in 1986. Vidal, whose prolific writing career spanned six decades, died Tuesday at age 86.
AP

Originally published on Thu August 2, 2012 4:31 am

Gore Vidal came from a generation of novelists whose fiction gave them a political platform. Norman Mailer ran for mayor of New York City; Kurt Vonnegut became an anti-war spokesman. And Vidal was an all-around critic. His novels sometimes infuriated readers with unflattering portraits of American history.

He also wrote essays and screenplays, and his play The Best Man currently has a revival on Broadway.

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Arts
3:09 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Washington's poet laureate reflects on growing up near Hanford in new book

Washington’s poet laureate Kathleen Flenniken has released a new book of poetry and remembrances of Richland, Washington and the Hanford Nuclear Reservation called “Plume.” Photo by Anna King

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 9:27 am

RICHLAND, Wash. – There is a lot written about the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in scientific journals, news articles and government reports. Now there is a book of poetry. The State of Washington’s poet laureate recently released a book of remembrances about her hometown of Richland. It’s called “Plume.”

We’re on the shore of the Columbia River at a Richland park. A flotilla of students, in bright kayaks, paddle against the current.

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NPR Music Interviews
4:59 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Bonnie Raitt: A Brand-New Model For A Classic Sound

Bonnie Raitt's latest album, Slipstream, is the first release on her own Redwing Records label.
Marina Chavez

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 2:24 pm

This April, roots-rock singer-guitarist Bonnie Raitt released her first album in seven years, Slipstream. It's classic Raitt, mixing bluesy slide-guitar riffs with her soulful voice and a pop-friendly sensibility.

The delivery system, however, is brand-new. After years of working with the majors, Raitt decided to start her own label, Redwing Records. Raitt runs Redwing with the help of a tiny staff; Slipstream is the first release in its catalog.

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Arts
5:29 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

Spending on the arts in Seattle grew despite recession, study shows

Benaroya Hall in downtown Seattle is home to the Seattle Symphony.
LWY / Flickr Creative Commons

Non-profit arts groups generated $447.6  million for Seattle’s economy in 2010. That’s over $1 million more than before the economic downturn, according to a recent study by Americans for the Arts, a national advocacy group.

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