Artscape

Artscape
5:03 am
Mon April 16, 2012

A 'dog' narrates the story in a new play at Book-It Theatre

David S. Hogan plays Enzo, a dog, and the narrator in "The Art of Racing In the Rain" at Book-It Theatre

“The Art of Racing in the Rain” tells the story of a wannabe race car driver living in Seattle. The story, though, is told through the eyes, ears and nose of a unique narrator: an especially philosophical dog.

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Artscape
4:55 am
Mon April 9, 2012

At Pacific Northwest Ballet, an old 'Apollo' teaches a first-timer

Principal dancer Seth Orza (left) rehearses "Apollo" with artistic director (and former New York City Ballet dancer) Peter Boal at Pacific Northwest Ballet in Seattle.
Photo by Lindsay Thomas

The ballet “Apollo” features four dancers in a story about the Greek god of music and three muses.

It was a signature role for Peter Boal when he was a dancer with New York City Ballet.

Now he's staging the ballet at Pacific Northwest Ballet, the first time since taking over as artistic director in 2005. And Boal is teaching the ballet to four male dancers who'll be dancing the role for the first time.

He says he's been waiting all these years for the right time as well as the right dancers.

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Artscape
4:30 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Paramount's library: A treasure trove of memories

1928 Model T Fords, top hats, and thousands of people spilling out onto 9th and Pike. It's the opening of Seattle's Paramount Theatre (originally called the Seattle Theatre). Now that rich history is archived in the new, fourth-floor Paramount library. 

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Artscape
4:30 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Was a homosexual life as public before WW2 as now?

Shower Bath by George Bellows, circa 1917

Right now the Tacoma Art Museum is the only place on the West Coast where you can see the controversial exhibit, Hide-Seek, Difference and Desire in American Portraiture.

The show covers nearly 150 years of art from the gay and lesbian perspective. It also explores the theory that the gay and straight worlds intermingled more freely before World War II.

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Artscape
4:58 am
Mon March 19, 2012

In Victoria B.C. artist Bill Blair creates whimsical, kitschy art

Artist Bill Blair with one of his one-of-a-kind paint-by-numbers guitar shrines at home in Victoria, B.C.
Photo by Florangela Davila

There's the type of art that hangs in museums, roped off to the public and well-guarded.

Then there's the kind of art that someone like Bill Blair of Victoria, B.C. creates. Art that's whimsical, kitschy, and suitable for places as distinguished as your home Tiki bar.

Exhibit A: His series of photomontages about fish, created after he became fixated with salmon puns.

"There was everything like 'Salmon-40-salmon,' a giant salmon with a nose cone of a Boeing 747.

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Artscape
5:55 am
Mon March 12, 2012

A wedding and chaos behind the scenes? A musical at Village Theatre

"It Shoulda Been You" tells the story of a Catholic groom and a Jewish bride. Pictured here is the "bride" and her family: Leslie Law (Judy Steinberg), Mara Solar (Rebecca Steinberg), John Dewar (Murray Steinberg), Kat Ramsburg (Jenny Steinberg)
Photo by Erinn Hale Courtesy of Village Theatre

"It Shoulda Been You," the new musical at Issaquah’s Village Theater, is for anyone who has been part of a wedding. There's joy as well as bickering; second-guessing and sometimes, suffering.

The bride’s Jewish. The groom’s Catholic. The parents don’t like each other and wish their children were marrying someone else. And an ex-boyfriend also shows up.

The musical is the first collaboration by composer Barbara Anselmi and lyricist and librettist Brian Hargrove.

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Artscape
4:30 am
Mon March 5, 2012

'A Song For Our Planet' - Hearing the sacred in the environment

Angela Sevin Flickr

Did you know that in just about every sacred text there is a reference to the environment? From the Bible to the Koran, to ancient Buddhist writings, there are passages that talk about how people have either been destroying the Earth or how we need to do a better job taking care of it.

A new coral work performed by Seattle First Baptist and Plymouth Church focuses entirely on the environment. It's called A Song For Our Planet.

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Artscape
5:00 am
Mon February 27, 2012

'Listen, Whitey!' book/CD looks back at Black Power music

Huey Newtown, co-founder of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, holds a record by Bob Dylan in an undated photo. The Panthers were big Dylan fans, author Pat Thomas notes in "Listen, Whitey! The Sights and Sounds of Black Power, 1965 to 1975."
courtesy of the publisher

There's a new book and CD that looks back at the potent soundtrack of the Black Power Movement. Listen, Whitey! The Sights and Sounds of Black Power, 1965-1975 (Fantagraphics) is the first book by Bay Area-transplant and Seattle author Pat Thomas.

"It's a book about how the music inspired the movement and the movement inspired the music," he said.

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Artscape
9:45 am
Mon February 20, 2012

Artscape: Revisiting the Oscars via the 20/20 awards

A scene from the Goodfellas, considered to be the second best Gangster movie ever made.

The Academy Awards are coming up this Sunday. There are many wonderful films that don’t get an Oscar. And there are lots of not-so-great movies that win the coveted award.  Seattle’s “20-20” awards look back at past Oscar winners and how they’ve stood the test of time.

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Artscape
8:27 am
Sun February 12, 2012

At the Frye Art Museum, a very quiet, very human work of art

Susie J. Lee. Still Lives: Exposure, 2010. HD video portrait in framed, matted LED monitor. Courtesy of the artist and Lawrimore Project.
Photo by Ryan K. Adams

What does 30 minutes in a person's life look like?

Artist Susie Lee asked and answered that question while spending time at the Washington Care Center, a long-term nursing facility and rehab unit.

What she created is a series of  highly-composed video portraits that are sometimes so quiet, you think they're still photos. The videos are silent. They last 30 minutes long -- real-time; there is no editing. And they feel so intimate, it can make viewers uncomfortable to watch.

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Artscape
8:55 am
Sun February 5, 2012

A mini-opera about the Everett Massacre of 1916

A "Wobbly," or member of the Industrial Workers of the World, circa 1914
Photo by Bain News Service Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.

The bloodiest event in Pacific Northwest labor history, the event that left 7 people dead and many more seriously injured, is the subject of a new mini-opera by Wayne Horvitz and Robin Holcomb at Seattle's ACT Theatre.

Called "Smokestack Arias," the work tells the story of the events of Nov. 5, 1916 when two boatloads of Industrial Workers of the World -- "Wobblies" -- arrived from Seattle to Everett.

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Artscape
9:16 am
Sun January 29, 2012

Seattle playwrights take on 'time' in latest Collective showcase

From the beginning of time when single-celled organisms were the only life on earth, to the multiverse where people can exist in parallel realities, to a dying woman who relives her romantic past through a photograph that freezes with the end of time – those are some of the plots for an upcoming showcase of Seattle-area playwrights.

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Artscape
9:52 am
Sun January 22, 2012

The majestic, four-legged performers of 'Cavalia'

"Cavalia: A Magical Encounter Between Human and Horse" combines equestrian and performing arts as well as live music and more than 40 horses.
Courtesy of "Cavalia"

There’s a village of white tents that look like a castle rising from Redmond’s Marymoor Park. It's home to both arena and stables for dozens of horses, the stars of "Cavalia: A Magical Encounter Between Man And Horse," which has been billed as "equestrian ballet."

Created in part by one of the people behind Cirque du Soleil, the show is a spectacle featuring acrobats, aerialists, musicians and, of course, riders. But these are riders who do stunts like ride standing up (picture "watersking" on a pair of horses galloping in a circle) or riding while doing the splits.

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Artscape
7:19 am
Sun January 15, 2012

At the Seattle Rep, a personal play by a priest about family

Tyler Pierce (as Bill Cain) and Linda Gehringer (as Mary Cain) star in the world premiere of Cain’s "How to Write a New Book for the Bible" at Seattle Repertory Theatre.
Photo courtesy of kevinberne.com

The latest play at Seattle Repertory Theatre is called "How To Write A New Book For The Bible." It's about a priest who comes home to take care of his dying mother.

It’s a true story, written by Jesuit priest and playwright Bill Cain.

Which partly explains the play's title. Cain says the play "is about sifting through the presence of God in the reality of family."

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Artscape
8:55 am
Sun January 8, 2012

More than Bing Crosby: Spokane's punk rock scene exposed in film

"I wonder what Bing (Crosby) would think about this film. He was a pretty hep cat so he might dig it."

Thirty years ago, Spokane was home to a small, passionate group of punk rockers. Artist David Halsell was part of that scene. (Studded leather jacket. Mohawk. Member of a band that threw up on people).

Now he and several other ex-punk rockers have made a documentary based on interviews with 30 musicians about that alternative music scene in their hometown.

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