Artscape

Artscape
10:00 am
Sun September 18, 2011

Freehold teaches the art of theater to all who seek it

Amontaine Woods, Carl Kennedy and Christian Jenkins in "The Purification Process" by Malka Lee, performed as part of the 2011 New Play Lab Showcase at Freehold Theatre in Seattle
Scott Maddock

Twenty years ago, a group of like-minded theater folk felt there was something missing in Seattle. There wasn't a lab where actors could take classes and try out new things.

"In New York, people work all the time," says Robin Lynn Smith. "In Los Angeles, you study when you’re not working. Here we wanted to have an opportunity for people to have that option to keep challenging themselves to go further. And then for creating work, we needed a place for experimentation."

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Artscape
8:00 am
Sun September 11, 2011

Prof. Fred revels in the marvel of movies so bad, they're good

Fred and Igor.

Can something be so terrible it’s actually good? Professor Fred Hopkins thinks so.

By day, Hopkins is a lawyer who helps people get out of paying big fines for traffic infractions. But in his spare time he is the enthusiastic host of Movie Marvels, a show that runs once a week on Seattle’s Community College TV channel.

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Artscape
8:45 am
Mon September 5, 2011

On Beacon Hill, a house is both home and public art gallery

Klara Glosova runs NEPO House, an art exhibition space, out of her Beacon Hill home. Her living room is frequently transformed by artists, such as Troy Gua, who show their work.
Photo by Florangela Davila

What if your neighbors turned their house into a public art gallery?

That’s what a few artists are doing in Seattle. There's a house in Ravenna, a house in the Central Area and a studio on Capitol Hill that are all transformed into temporary art venues for an art-craving public.

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Artscape
8:30 am
Sun August 28, 2011

Seattle's Pinata Man creates happiness one whack at a time

The Ninja pinata under construction by pinata maker Alex Lopez. Its destination: a birthday party for a 17-year-old girl.

In Seattle’s South Park neighborhood, Alex Lopez has carved out a reputation as the go-to-guy for making unique piñatas.

Case in point: a 26-foot-long, 7-feet-tall, 6-feet-wide pinata in the shape of a bridge. It dumped 450 pounds of candy.

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Artscape
8:40 am
Sun August 21, 2011

Youth in Focus: A story that lens itself to art

Khatsini Simani is documenting downtown Seattle as part of a summer participant in the Youth in Focus program. The program empowers young people through photography.
Florangela Davila KPLU

A busy street with lots of cars, bikes and people rushing from one place to another. Except for that one person over there with a camera ... and that one over there.

They're students with Seattle's Youth in Focus (YIF) program who are documenting the area around Second Avenue and Cherry in downtown Seattle.

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Artscape
6:15 am
Sun August 14, 2011

The banjo in Seattle Opera's "Porgy and Bess"

John Patrick Lowrie holds the 1920s banjo he plays in Seattle Opera's "Porgy and Bess."
Courtesy of Seattle Opera

You don't expect to find a banjo in the orchestra pit at Seattle Opera. But there it is, getting warmed up by John Patrick Lowrie, a half-hour before showtime for "Porgy and Bess."

From the first day of rehearsal, Lowrie made an impression upon the orchestra.

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Artscape
4:32 pm
Sun August 7, 2011

Tulalip cultural center helps maintain tribe's traditions

Tessa Campbell, assistant curator at the Hibulb Cultural Center, sits next to a family tree showing her oldest relatives on census records.
Charla Bear KPLU

Native Americans have struggled to hang onto their cultures for decades. On August 20th, a local tribe will have a new resource to help.

The Tulalips are opening a cultural center on their reservation. It not only shares history the way the tribe sees it, but bridges the past with modern-day life.

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Artscape
8:00 am
Sun July 24, 2011

Book explores the phenomenon that is 'West Side Story'

Richard Beymer and Natalie Wood sing "Tonight" in the 1961 movie version of "West Side Story." The musical and movie are the subjects of a new book, "Something's Coming, Something Good: West Side Story and the American Imagination" by Misha Berson.
Photofest

When "West Side Story" opened in 1957 on Broadway, the audience's reaction was silence. Followed by applause.

"No Broadway musical ended with these deaths and this very sad young woman walking off the stage with her head bowed. That was just, 'Whoa!'" author Misha Berson explained.

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Artscape
9:00 am
Sun July 17, 2011

Exploring the limits of privacy at Henry's 'The Talent Show'

Stranger (6) 1999 by Shizuka Yokomizo
Shizuka Yokomizo Collection of Leslie Cohan, Minneapolis

The desire to be on the public stage is on display right now at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle. It’s called “The Talent Show.” The exhibit raises a lot of questions ranging from how much should we put on display to what happens to our images once they are out there.

It’s easy to forget how much effort went in to trying to be seen by the public eye.

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Artscape
8:10 am
Sun July 10, 2011

Recess Monkey is kindie-rock fun

Recess Monkey -- Jack Forman, Daron Henry and Drew Holloway -- perform at Auburn Kids Day 2011.
Photo by Florangela Davila

What inspires bands to make music? For Recess Monkey, it’s the lives of kindergarteners and grade schoolers.

All three musicians – Drew Holloway, Jack Forman and Daron Henry – in the band teach at Seattle elementary schools. And they're having anything but a sleepy summer: playing gigs and promoting their latest CD, "Flying" is on their agenda.

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Artscape
4:53 pm
Sun July 3, 2011

The trees get 'yarn bombed' in Seattle's Occidental Park

All 27 trees, 16 lamp posts and 57 bollards in Seattle's Occidental Park have been "yarn bombed" by artist Suzanne Tidwell as part of a summer art installation.
Florangela Davila KPLU

Seattle’s Occidental Park is a leafy oasis in the middle of the city. It’s now also the site of a whimsical installation where all 27 trees and 16 lamp posts and 57 short poles are dressed up in yarn.

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Artscape
9:00 am
Sun June 26, 2011

Five reasons why Memphis should get props for the blues

A blues joint on Beale Street in Memphis, Tenn.
Bo Nash Flickr

Memphis, Tenn., is known as the birthplace of rock 'n roll. But KPLU's Nick Morrison says it should also be known for the blues.

Nick gives five examples of how Memphis and its neighbor, West Memphis, Ark., rank right up there with the Mississippi Delta and Chicago when it comes to launching the careers of influential blues artists.

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Artscape
8:14 am
Sun June 19, 2011

Now on stage at ACT: Romance and clashing cultures

Shanga Parker plays Musa and Carole Roscoe plays Sheri in "Pilgrims Musa and Sheri in the New World," which is now playing at Seattle's ACT Theatre.
Photo by Chris Bennion

Seattle playwright Yussef El Guindi usually delves into heavy stuff: racial profiling and terrorism.

But his new play, "Pilgrims Musa and Sheri in the New World," which is having its world premiere at Seattle's ACT Theatre, is a romantic comedy.

Musa is an Egyptian immigrant who picks up a woman named Sheri in his cab on a late night in New York City.

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Artscape
8:19 am
Sun June 12, 2011

The art of circus school

Anna Partridge of Mercer Island was one of the first students at The School of Acrobatics and New Circus Arts when it opened in 2004. She'll be spending her summer as part of a children's circus troupe in Vermont.
Photo by Florangela Davila

There's a downside to hanging out at the School of Acrobatics and New Circus Arts (SANCA) and that is, you start to feel really boring.

There's Nickolai Pirak, an expert juggler. And Erica Rubinstein, who basically juggles people.

"If you can imagine a 12-foot-long bar that’s kind of like a beam and a trampoline, but supported by people. Our flier stands in the middle of the bar," Rubinstein says.

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Artscape
9:00 am
Sun June 5, 2011

Play tackles fears of young Native Americans after woodcarver killed

Young Native American actors portray prisoners in the Red Eagle Soaring production, A Right To Justice. The play aims to help youth work out their feelings about police since Ian Birk, a former Seattle officer, shot woodcarver John T. Williams.
Charla Bear KPLU

It’s been more than nine months since a Seattle police officer killed First Nations woodcarver John T. Williams, and tensions are still running high among Native Americans. They say the shooting brings up the long history of brutality Native people have faced.

The anxiety has also affected children, who’ve had a tough time putting Williams’ death in perspective.

This coming weekend, a local theater group will debut a performance to help young Native Americans move forward, starting with a look at the past.

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