Food

Food
4:24 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Panel recommends harvest cutbacks on small schooling fish

Photo courtesy of Lenfest Forage Fish Task Force

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 12:00 am

An international research panel recommends cutting in half the global harvest of small, schooling fish like sardines, anchovy and herring. The group included researchers from the Northwest.

The panel estimates little fish are roughly twice as valuable in the sea as in the net because so many larger sea creatures prey on them.

Oregon State University professor Selina Heppell co-authored the study. She's proud to say the sardine and mackerel fisheries on the U.S. West Coast are already managed quite conservatively.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:14 pm
Mon April 2, 2012

Most Americans are getting enough vitamins, CDC says

Just because we're eating our vitamins doesn't mean our diets are as healthful as they should be.
gerenme iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 1:29 pm

Here's some good news about Americans' diets: Most of us are getting sufficient amounts of key vitamins and minerals. That's the finding of a nutrition report just out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

Vitamins A and D, folate, iron and iodine are just a few of the nutrients assessed in the nationwide survey, which uses data collected between 1999 and 2006. Overall, less than 10 percent of the population appeared deficient in each nutrient.

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NPR food
11:42 am
Thu March 29, 2012

What is community supported agriculture? The answer keeps changing

A member of the community supported agriculture program at Congregation Shearith Israel picks from boxes of squash and cucumbers in Atlanta. Some purists say CSAs are drifting away from their roots.
John Amis AP

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 11:10 am

Community supported agriculture sounds so simple. Support a local farm, get to know your farmer, enjoy weekly deliveries of fresh produce, and rest easy knowing that you've voted for the local economy with your food dollars.

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Food
4:30 am
Wed March 28, 2012

Best ever chicken pot pie, plus French toast

What no soggy undercrust? I love a soggy undercrust. Click for this week's garlic cam shot.
Nancy Leson

In this week's Food for Thought, Nancy talks about her chicken pot pie recipe and I pile in with an abbreviated list of the things I think  I make the best of. We also recruited KPLU newsies Paula Wissel and Erin Hennessey along with production maven Nick Morrison to brag on what  their significant others say are their culinary triumphs.  

Click where it says "Listen" to hear all about it.

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The Salt
8:46 am
Tue March 27, 2012

Shad are angling to once again be the tasty harbinger of spring

This hickory shad is fun to catch, but its cousin the American shad is the tastiest.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue March 27, 2012 7:46 am

For most of American history, early spring meant a feast of shad. That tradition has faded, but young chefs are trying to slip the ritual back onto plates.

The earliest Americans from from Florida to Nova Scotia caught shad by the basketful as they swam back from the sea to spawn in their home rivers. The fresh, silvery fish was most certainly a delight after winter's dreary fare. The American shad's Latin name is clue to its allure: Alosa sapadissima, or most delicious herring.

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Food
4:00 am
Wed March 21, 2012

Go green and leafy – bacon optional

Nancy's lunch last week at Terra Plata on Capitol Hill. Click for the next picture to see the shocking developments at Dick's Garlic Cam.
Nancy Leson

Well, optional for you maybe.  Me, I like a nice hunk of bacon nestled in there with some slow-cooked collards.  I got  turned on to eating them with a few shakes of the hot pepper vinegar  on the counter at Lamar's, a greasy spoon I used to frequent in Biloxi.

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The Salt
2:02 pm
Wed March 14, 2012

Fish and spices top list of imported foods that make us sick

More than 75 percent of the fish consumed in the U.S. is imported.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 14, 2012 1:58 pm

Disease outbreaks with imported foods are on the rise, and fish and spices are the foods most likely to cause problems.

It's not that imported foods are any nastier than home-grown, according to a presentation today from researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It's that we're eating a lot more of them.

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Food for Thought
4:30 am
Wed March 14, 2012

They don't eat corned beef and cabbage in Ireland

A morning after restorative: Leftover corned beef omelette. Click the next pic for this week's Garlic Cam shot.
Nancy Leson

Sure, the traditional St. Patrick's  Day dinner all over the world is corned beef and cabbage.  But not in Ireland.  So what do the Irish in Ireland eat on March 17th?

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Food for Thought
4:30 am
Wed March 7, 2012

If only Thin Mints cookies actually made you thin

My box didn't last too long. For the latest garlic cam shots take a look at the next picture.
Dick Stein

This Monday, March 12th, in honor the 100th anniversary of the Girl Scouts and the 95th anniversary of Girl Scout cookies, I will eat an entire carton of Thin Mints. Sure, I could do more. I could eat two cartons.

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Diversions
2:04 pm
Tue March 6, 2012

Auburn man wins Great American SPAM Championship

The award-winning Mini Maple SPAM Doughnuts
The Blue Ribbon Group

An airplane mechanic from Auburn has won the top prize in the Great American SPAM Championship.

41-year old Jason Munson's Mini Maple SPAM Doughnuts won a blue ribbon last September at the Puyallup Fair. His recipe went on to the national competition, where this week it beat out 800 other entries for the top honors.

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The Salt
12:53 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Sustainable sushi: See the video, but don't eat the eel

Odds are the local sushi joint's fish is less than sustainable.
Matteo De Stefano IStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 12:38 pm

Sushi seems like the perfect modern food: Light, healthful and available at seemingly every supermarket in the nation. But is it sustainable?

That's the question behind "The Story of Sushi," a new video that's been pulling a lot of clicks in the past week. Maybe that's because its adorable format, with tiny, handcrafted figures used to tell the tale, stands in stark contrast to its depressing message: Most of the sushi we snarf up is harvested using unsustainable methods.

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The Salt
3:46 pm
Thu March 1, 2012

Seattle's First Urban Food Forest Will Be Open To Foragers

Designers of a food forest in Seattle want to make blueberry picking a neighborly activity.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu March 1, 2012 4:41 pm

If you're a regular reader of The Salt, you've probably noticed our interest in foraging. From San Francisco to Maryland, we've met wild food experts, nature guides and chefs passionate about picking foods growing in their backyards.

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Food for Thought
4:30 am
Wed February 29, 2012

Exciting news for cracker snackers

Nancy's favorite crackers. I'd show you mine but you've probably already seen a Cheez-it. Click for the next pic – installment one of the Dick's GarlicCam series.
Nancy Leson Seattle Times

No, not  about Cracker the p(t)et pterodactyl in Captain Underpants. He'd snack on you. Nor do I refer to the Hamadryas  genus of brush-footed butterflies commonly called The Cracker. This is about the kind of crackers you eat. And eat. And eat.

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Food and the law
11:22 am
Mon February 27, 2012

Judge dismisses organic farmers' case against Monsanto

Farmer Alan Madison fills a seed hopper with Monsanto hybrid seed corn near Arlington, Illinois, U.S. A group of organic and other growers say they're concerned they'll be sued by Monsanto if pollen from seeds like these drift onto their fields.
Daniel Acker Landov

Originally published on Tue February 28, 2012 8:37 am

A New York federal court today dismissed a lawsuit against agribusiness giant Monsanto brought by thousands of certified organic farmers. The farmers hoped the suit would protect them against infringing on the company's crop patents in the future.

The Organic Seed Growers and Trade Association and several other growers and organizations do not use Monsanto seeds. But they were betting that the judge would agree that Monsanto should not be allowed to sue them if pollen from the company's patented crops happened to drift into their fields.

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Food for Thought
4:30 am
Wed February 22, 2012

Is 'yogurt' an ugly word?

Yogurt. Eat it and you could live to be older than a Henny Youngman joke.
My recipes.com

I think so.  Just look at it: Yogurt. Call it a typographical phobia but I'm not eatin' anything that looks like that word.   Even its etymology is not encouraging. 

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