Japanese internment

Preserving History
10:24 am
Wed September 17, 2014

Federal Grants To Help Preserve History Of WWII Japanese Internment Sites

Five men playing board game in barracks at the Kooskia Internment Camp. ca. 1944.
University of Idaho Digital Initiatives

After the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, U.S. government officials rounded up Japanese Americans and sent them to harsh, ill-equipped camps. Now, the National Park Service has announced $3 million in new grants to help preserve that important history.

Stacey Camp, an associate professor at the University of Idaho, is leading an effort to survey the Kooskia Internment site with help from federal Park Service grants.

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Artscape
5:00 am
Mon September 15, 2014

'Panama Hotel Jazz' Music Project Tells Story Of The Historic Seattle Landmark

This early picture of the hotel was photographed in 1929. The building still maintains much of the original sturcture.
Courtesy of Jan Johnson, the third owner of the Panama Hotel

The muse behind Steve Grigg’s musical project is a brick, six-story, century-old building that stands in what used to be Seattle’s Japantown.

The Panama Hotel, on the corner of Sixth and Main, remains a working hotel. But the historic building is also a time capsule. It features belongings left behind by Japanese Americans who were forced into internment camps during World War II.

Griggs’ project, called “Panama Hotel Jazz,” weaves in music with narration to tell the story about the incarceration of Japanese and Japanese Americans in 1942.

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Preserving History
10:18 am
Tue September 13, 2011

WSU previews largest collection of internment photos

Heart Mountain Internee George Hirahara (shown) created this darkroom in his barracks in the Fall of 1943 by ordering equipment and supplies from Sears and Roebuck catalog.
Courtesy of WSU

Washington State University in Pullman previewed a photo collection this morning that's considered to be the largest ever of a World War II internment camp.

The 2,000 donated images come from the family of a father-son team from Yakima. Frank and George Hirahara took pictures and operated a dark room while they were detained at a camp in Heart Mountain, Wyo. Patti Hirahara says her father, Frank, wanted to depict what life was like at the camp.

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Japanese Internment
5:27 pm
Fri July 8, 2011

Photo collection from Japanese internment camp donated

Heart Mountain Internee George Hirahara (shown) created this darkroom in his barracks in the Fall of 1943 by ordering equipment and supplies from Sears and Roebuck catalog.
Courtesy of WSU

The largest private collection of photographs taken during World War II at an internment camp for Japanese-Americans is being donated to Washington State University.

The more than 2,000 black and white photo negatives were taken by George Hirahara and his son Frank between 1943 and 1945 at the Heart Mountain camp in Wyoming. (More photos inside.)

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