Japanese Tsunami

Japanese Tsunami
1:18 pm
Tue April 24, 2012

Things you'll find from the Japanese tsunami on NW beaches

Anna Pietz and her daughter examine debris at Rialto Beach in La Push, Wash., on Saturday. The two had volunteered with Washington Coastsavers. Pietz said they did find a Japanese float believed to be from the tsunami.
Anna Pietz

If you visit a Northwest ocean beach this summer, you’ll likely run across objects from last year’s Japanese tsunami.

The things you’ll likely see include milk jugs, detergent bottles, tooth brushes and bottles for water, pop or juices with Japanese stamps, marks and labels. Perhaps a soccer ball or a volleyball -- two that washed up on an Alaskan island have been claimed by their Japanese owners.

The things you are highly unlikely to see are human remains, refrigerators or anything else that would have to be sealed to float or can come apart, like bigger parts of houses. Months on the ocean will breakup anything with parts, experts say.

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Japanese Tsunami
1:16 pm
Wed April 18, 2012

Tsunami debris hits NW coast; poster tells how to deal with it

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's model for where the Japanese tsunami debris is located.

Debris from last year’s Japanese tsunami has in fact hit Northwest beaches, according to new modeling by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Washington state is putting up posters to help you decide what to do if you spot any.

The new model by NOAA shows where the debris is, not when the bulk of it will hit the shores. But, as has been reported, some debris has crossed the ocean. Last week, the Coast Guard sank a derelict Japanese fishing vessel off the coast of Southeast Alaska. Also, glass and plastic floats have turned up.

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Japanese Tsunami
12:46 pm
Mon April 9, 2012

Coast Guard watching sheen after sinking 'ghost ship'

Ryou-un Maru, the derelict fishing vessel sank at 6:15 pm in 6,000 feet of water. Photo courtesy U.S. Coast Guard

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 1:35 pm

The Coast Guard is watching for fuel and debris from a derelict Japanese fishing vessel it sank off the coast of Southeast Alaska on Thursday.

Kip Wadlow is with the agency’s public affairs office. He says all that was spotted was a small sheen. But he expected that to dissipate quickly.

Wadlow says the Ryou-un Maru went down at 6:15 p.m. local time in about 6,000 feet of water.

"When the ship started to sink, the starboard quarter, or the right-back side, went in the water first. And then the ship just slowly rolled over and sank."

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Japanese tsunami
12:28 pm
Fri March 30, 2012

Cantwell, Begich: Plan now for tsunami debris

With a derelict Japanese fishing boat floating off the coast of Canada, U.S. senators from Alaska and Washington state say the United States needs to hurry up and get ready for more debris from last year's Japanese tsunami.

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Japanese Tsunami
10:36 am
Sun March 11, 2012

Japan's tsunami recalled in beautifully animated Simone White song

Hideyuki Katsumata

Originally published on Sun March 11, 2012 5:54 am

The Los Angeles-based singer Simone White has a voice like ether. It's sweetly airy and hypnotic. Hearing it can pull you under to a strangely beautiful, glittering world where nothing seems real.

On "In The Water Where The City Ends," from her latest record, Silver Silver, White's voice is at its most haunting as she recalls, in disjointed poetry, the tsunami that devastated Japan's Tohoku region last year.

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Japanese Tsunami
9:32 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Latest estimates: 1 to 5 percent of tsunami debris could reach N. America

This file photo taken Tuesday Feb. 21, 2012 shows clothing lying in heaps at the site of a neighborhood destroyed by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, in Rikuzentakata, Japan. Scientists believe ocean waves carried away 3-4 million tons.
The Associated Press

HONOLULU — Tsunamis generated by the magnitude-9 earthquake in Japan last March dragged 3 million to 4 million tons of debris into the ocean after tearing up Japanese harbors and homes.

Scientists believe ocean currents are carrying some of the lumber, refrigerators, fishing boats and other objects across the Pacific toward the United States.

One to 5 percent of the 1 million to 2 million tons of debris still in the ocean may reach Hawaii, Alaska, Oregon and Washington and British Columbia, said University of Hawaii senior researcher and ocean current expert Nikolai Maximenko.

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Japanese Tsunami
8:39 am
Mon January 30, 2012

Japanese official inspects Neah Bay flotsam

PORT ANGELES, Wash. — An official from the Japanese consulate in Seattle has visited the home of a Port Angeles man to inspect a large black float he found near Neah Bay to determine if it's some of the first debris from the tsunami that hit Japan last March.

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