Other News

Public Safety
4:40 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Seattle Mayor Calls For 'Summer Of Safety,' A Coordinated Strategy For Fighting Disorder

File image
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP Photo

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has issued a sweeping call for a “summer of safety,” an integrated approach to public safety that would lead to longer-term priority.

Standing before members of the Seattle City Council Wednesday, Murray touched on police reform, racial disparities, infrastructure and mental health. He said up to now, there has been a sense that the city doesn’t really have a clear, coordinated strategy for fighting crime and disorder.

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Criminal Justice System
10:06 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Inslee Launches Review Of Prison Population Growth In Wash. State

Michael Coghlan Flickr

Washington state’s prison system is projected to need 1,000 new beds by 2018. And that growth has Gov. Jay Inslee concerned.

Inslee on Tuesday announced a Department of Justice-backed review of the state’s criminal justice system. The goal is to look for ways to save money without jeopardizing public safety.

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Darrington Rodeo
11:47 am
Mon June 23, 2014

Rodeo Band-Aid: Roping, Riding Helps People Heal From Oso Landslide

Alexis Blakey, 20, of Oso, Washington says running barrels with her horse Tax helps her hit the pause button on memories of the landslide for a few brief moments.
Anna King

The Timberbowl Rodeo in the town of Darrington, Washington saw some of its largest crowds ever this past weekend. Neighbors gathered at the event to hug, shake hands and heal from the tragic Oso landslide.

Alexis Blakey knows nearly everyone in the small town that lies 74 miles northeast of Seattle. A native of nearby Oso, Washington, 20-year-old Blakey said the landslide that made her town infamous is branded on her brain. She was at these same rodeo grounds that day when she saw ambulance after ambulance headed for Oso.

“I don’t know," Blakey said. "We were all just like, 'What is going on? Is this really happening right now?'”

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Missing Hiker
12:38 pm
Fri June 20, 2014

Crews Search For Missing Hiker On Mount Rainier Amid Snowy Conditions

Mount Rainier is seen in the distance from a viewpoint within Mount Rainier National Park on Sunday, June 1, 2014.
Rachel La Corte AP Photo

Search and rescue teams are combing the east side of Mount Rainier where a Seattle woman has gone missing amid snowy conditions.

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Senior Thesis
5:00 am
Wed June 18, 2014

How A Former Top Boeing Manager Set Aside Fears And Smashed The Glass Ceiling

Carolyn Corvi in the 737 factory in Renton. After the Nisqually earthquake, Corvi spearheaded a redesign that moved engineers' offices closer to the factory floor.
Courtesy of Carolyn Corvi.

Editor's Note: “Senior Thesis” is a special week-long series that brings together venerable veterans in various fields with university students hoping to forge a career in the same field.

Jaime Katzer showed up at the studio in her best business attire, excited but a little nervous. The University of Washington senior was here to meet a woman who from the outside appears fearless.

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Senior Thesis
5:00 am
Tue June 17, 2014

What Veteran Seattle Actor Wright Knows Now About Getting That First Big Break

Bob Wright, commonly known to theatergoers by his Actors Equity name R. Hamilton Wright, performs in the Seattle Repertory Theatre's recent production of "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf."
Photo courtesy Alan Alabastro Seattle Repertory Theatre

Editor's Note: “Senior Thesis” is a special week-long series that brings together venerable veterans in various fields with university students hoping to forge a career in the same field.

Actors, especially aspiring actors, can't wait for the perfect role to come along, says veteran of the Seattle stage Bob Wright.

"Put yourself in a position to work," said the actor who's been listed in Seattle Playbills with the name "R. Hamilton Wright" since 1979. "It's better to work than not work. Find ways to act."

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Judicial Independence
4:54 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

OIC Whistleblower Speaks, Says She's Still Muzzled

An administrative law judge who accused the state Office of the Insurance Commissioner of pressuring her to rule in its favor broke her silence Monday, but she told lawmakers she’s not allowed to give them the whole story.

Patricia Petersen appeared before the state Senate Law and Justice Committee. She said she wants to tell the legislators what’s behind her spat with the OIC, including her accusation that the agency’s second-in-command pressured her to rule in the office’s favor.

But Petersen, in her first public comments since lodging a whistleblower complaint against her boss, said the commissioner gave her a gag order on the matter while it’s being investigated.

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Senior Thesis
5:00 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Veteran Journalist James: Yes, You Must Make Choices, But Choices Aren't Limitations

Courtesy of KING Broadcasting

Editor’s Note: “Senior Thesis” is a special week-long series that brings together venerable veterans in various fields with university students hoping to forge a career in the same field.

The college senior sat across from the retired anchorman. She'd brought a list of questions, but only looked at it once. She knew what to ask; she’d been thinking about it for the last four years.

“Do you feel like your career got in the way of other things?” she said.

“Oh, sure,” the anchorman said.

“I’m scared of that,” she said. “I don’t want to end up with a great career, but still have regrets of things I didn’t do.”

“Life is about choices,” he replied with reassurance, not admonition. Yes, you have to make choices, he said, so why not choose a little of everything?

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On Determination
2:49 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Blind Mountain Climber From Seattle Area Sets Out To Summit Denali

Josh Gautreau, Bruce Stobie and Mike Haugen are ready to fly to the base camp of Denali.
RMI Expeditions

The big day has arrived for Bruce Stobie, the blind mountain climber featured in a KPLU story last month

Stobie flew to the base camp of Denali Thursday morning to begin his expedition. The Maple Valley man is aiming to become the fourth blind person to climb North America’s tallest mountain.

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Bike Share
1:01 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Study Finds Bike Shares Increase Proportion Of Head Injuries; Seattle To Offer Helmets

FILE - In this Tuesday, June 25, 2013, photo, a biker rides without a helmet on a Citibike, as part of New York City's bike sharing system, in New York.
Bebeto Matthews AP Photo

New research suggests that bike share programs have a downside, but the program Seattle is launching this fall will have a key feature that could help mitigate it.

Researchers from the University of Washington and Washington State University looked at bicycle injury data from 10 major cities, both with and without bike share programs. They found that when a city gets a bike share program, a higher proportion of injuries to its cyclists are head injuries. 

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Holocaust Museum
5:01 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Washington State's First Holocaust Museum To Be Unveiled In Downtown Seattle

An artist's rendering depicts what the gallery of the Holocaust Center for Humanity is expected to look like when it opens.
Courtesy of the Wshington Holocaust Education Resocure Center

The nation’s newest Holocaust museum, and the first in Washington state, is about to be unveiled in downtown Seattle. Its founders hope it will connect lessons from history with present-day issues.

The people behind the Holocaust Center for Humanity have been working in Washington classrooms for decades. Now they’ll have a permanent home in Seattle’s Belltown neighborhood, where teachers, students and the public can come to them.

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Radioactive Waste
5:00 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Japan Looks To Richland-Made Filters To Treat Radioactive Water

John Raymont, founder and president of Kurion, stands inside one of his company’s containerized mobile strontium filter units.
Anna King

Japan’s crippled nuclear plant is bleeding hazardous radioactive water at a mind-staggering rate. Officials at Fukushima Daiichi are filling 27-foot-tall tanks nearly every other day. Now, in southeast Washington, a company called Kurion is developing and building a mobile filter system to help deal with that troublesome radioactive wastewater.

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Marijuana Legalization
9:55 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Showdown Over Wenatchee's Pot Business Ban Could Have Statewide Consequences

AP Photo

A would-be marijuana merchant is suing the city of Wenatchee over its ban on pot businesses. The outcome could have big implications for other local governments trying to keep out cannabis.

Shaun Preder of SMP Retail wants to open a retail pot store in Wenatchee. But the city does not grant licenses to businesses that don’t comply with federal law, which still considers marijuana illegal.

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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
4:17 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

For PTSD Patients, Better Outcomes For Less Money If They Get To Choose Treatment

Patients given teh choice of pharmaceuticals or psychotherapy did better than those who were assigned treament.
Derek Gunnlaugson Flickr

Letting patients with post-traumatic stress disorder choose how they want to be treated can produce better outcomes for less money, according to a new study co-written by a University of Washington psychologist.

Treating someone with PTSD often comes down to a question of whether they get counseling or pharmaceuticals. The new study offers some evidence about which one works better, but even stronger evidence that letting the patient make the choice produces the best outcomes for the least cost.

Prof. Lori Zoellner, director of UW’s Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress, said letting patients decide helps them get the treatment best suited for them, and also increases their buy-in to whichever option they go with.

"You're probably more likely to take your medication regularly, to attend your psychiatrist visits more regularly. And in psychotherapy, you may also be more likely to do the homework," she said.

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Messy Commute
12:34 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Gridlock On Seattle's I-5 After Metal Comes Loose

Traffic was backed up for more than 11 miles on Thursday morning.
Washington state DOT

If you tried to make it into downtown Seattle during rush hour this morning, you have our sympathy. Just before 6 a.m., a metal plate popped out of an expansion joint along southbound I-5 just south of I-90. Three lanes of the freeway were closed and the resulting backup, at its peak, stretched more than 11 miles. 

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