University of Washington

Martian Chronicles
3:10 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

Martian Mystery: How Water Could Have Flowed on Chilly Mars

A NASA photo shows gully channels on teh surface of Mars, thought to have been caused by flowing water.
NASA

A University of Washington researcher may have helped solve a Martian mystery by explaining how the chilly surface of Mars could have once flowed with water.

Pictures of Mars clearly show features that look like valleys and old lakebeds, suggesting liquid water once churned on the planet's surface. And yet that surface is really cold, at -80 degrees Fahrenheit, on average.

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Snow Science
5:01 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Strange Snow Finding Suggests Fewer Trees Mean More Water

UW reserahcres found that in temperate climates, snow melts faster under trees than in clearings.
Kael Martin University of Washington

Quick quiz: In springtime, does snow melt faster out in the open or in the shade? 

You might figure it melts faster in the sunshine, and that seems to be the case for cold climates. But in places with temperate winters, like the Pacific Northwest, it might be just the opposite.

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creativity
5:00 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Study: Today's Teens Pushing Limits in Art, but Not in Writing

Gabriel Garcia Marengo Flickr

Today’s teens are pushing the boundaries in their artwork, but playing it safe in the stories they write, according to new research by the University of Washington Information School and the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Using a set of criteria, the study examined artwork and writing produced by teens and published in magazines between 1990 and 2011.

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deciphering coastal history
5:11 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

UW Researcher: Redwoods Reveal Years of Coastal Climate History

Michael Schweppe Flickr

Count the rings on a tree trunk to figure out its age.

Or, if you’re University of Washington climatologist Jim Johnstone, study the molecules of a redwood trunk and crack the code for natural weather data that could date back more than a thousand years.

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Death Toll of Iraq War
3:42 pm
Tue October 15, 2013

Seattle Researchers: Death Toll for Iraq War Likely Near Half Million

Justin Steyer

Seattle researchers led an effort that has produced a new estimate of war-related deaths in Iraq, finding 461,000 Iraqis have died. The study is the first of its kind to cover the entire span of the Iraq War, from 2003 to 2011.

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Science
5:01 am
Mon October 14, 2013

UW Engineer's Design Could Help Deaf People Enjoy Music

Cochlear implants are a lifesaver for many deaf people, but they can't recognize changes in pitch.
National Institutes of Health

Engineers at the University of Washington have developed a way for some deaf people to enjoy music. The findings could help people with cochlear implants, a bionic inner ear that allows deaf or hearing-impaired people to hear speech, albeit in kind of a robot voice.

Cochlear implants can be a lifesaver for people without hearing, but when it comes to music, this very practical device can’t carry a tune to save its life.

The implants simply aren’t sensitive to pitch and what’s called timbre—the qualities of a sound that make, say, a guitar sound different from a harp.

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deep sea innovation
4:13 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Seattle Co. Partners with UW to Build One-of-a-Kind Submarine

Rendering of manned deep sea sub in development in Seattle.

A commercial submarine operator is teaming up with the University of Washington to build a new manned deep-sea sub. The five-passenger mini-sub could be available for charter by oil companies or researchers beginning in 2016.

Seattle-based OceanGate Inc. currently operates two small submarines for hire. It sees a market for deeper diving manned submersibles. To that end, the small company has partnered with the University of Washington and Boeing to design a stubby, bullet-shaped mini-sub with a 180-degree viewing dome in its nose.

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Sports with Art Thiel
5:00 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Huskies vs.Ducks: Beyond Regional Rivalry

In this photo made with a fish-eye wide angle lens, Washington's Mike Criste (78) and Kevin King (20) run out of the tunnel into newly renovated Husky Stadium for an NCAA college football game against Boise State, Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013, in Seattle.
Ted S. Warren AP Photo

The Washington Huskies host the Oregon Ducks Saturday in a highly-anticipated game. It begins at 1 p.m. at Husky Stadium in Seattle, but fans will be gathering well before that, with cable station ESPN featuring the matchup in their weekly “College GameDay” program—a first for Washington.

KPLU sports commentator Art Thiel says this year, the game is more than just a regional rivalry; it’s a matchup between two nationally-ranked teams.  

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uw ranking
1:09 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

UW Ranks High for 'Best Bang for Buck,' Public Good Contributions

University of Washington Visitors Center's Facebook Page

The University of Washington is one of the highest-rankings schools when it comes to contributions to the public good, according to the Washington Monthly.

The school is also one of the magazine’s top 20 picks on its “best bang for the buck” list.

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climate change
5:41 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Mounting Consequences as Arctic Sea Ice Melts

Melting sea ice in the Arctic is reducing food sources for polar bears—just one of many consequences, according to a new Review article published in the journal, Science.
Cecilia Bitz photo

Arctic sea ice is melting at record rates, and the loss of that ice could drive significant degradation of marine and terrestrial ecosystems, according to a researcher at the University of Washington. The researcher, Cecilia Bitz, is part of an international team of scientists whose findings are published this week in the journal, Science

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Science
10:10 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

UW Team Hunts Tiny Genetic Flaws Linked to Big Problems

A rendering shows how synthetic DNA bonds with real DNA, revealing the presence of a flaw.
Courtesy of University of Washington / Nature Chemistry

Even the tiniest misprint in a person’s genetic code can cause big health problems, but they can be hard to find. Now members of a team at University of Washington say they’ve designed a better way to track down those mutations.

If you think of DNA as a twisted ladder, each rung is made of two little structures called bases, stuck together. If even one of the billions of these rungs gets copied wrong it can have serious consequences, such as which kind of tuberculosis you get.

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A Volcano's Scream
10:51 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Before an Eruption, Scientists Record a Volcano's Primal Scream

Mt. Redoubt erupted violently in 2009, after letting out a primal "scream."
Max Kaufman Alaska Volcano Observatory/University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute

Most volcanoes rumble before they erupt, but Washington and Alaska researchers say a big recent eruption was preceded not by a rumble, but a scream.

Alaska’s Mount Redoubt blew its top several times in 2009. Leading up to many of the explosions were a series of little earthquakes—not uncommon for an active volcano. But these quakes began to accelerate, one after another, like a drumbeat building to a climax.

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Higher Education
4:50 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Fire tragedy prompts study-abroad student to push for safety upgrades

Grace Flott was one of the survivors of a devastating fire in Paris in 2010.
Paula Wissel

Spending a semester abroad is often a highlight of college life. But for one University of Washington graduate, it was anything but.

Grace Flott is still dealing with scars from a tragedy she suffered while overseas. Now she’s working to help others learn from her experience.

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Transportation alternatives
3:14 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Expert: Downtown Seattle streets 'extremely dangerous' for bicyclists

Craig Damlo Flickr

Seattle consistently ranks high on top-10 lists for bike-friendly cities. But the keynote speaker at an urban cycling symposium taking place at the University of Washington this week gives Seattle a scathing review.

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Transportation alternatives
5:01 am
Thu June 20, 2013

Cycling symposium: Seattle’s primer for more urban biking

Craig Damlo Flickr

Experts on urban cycling are convening at the University of Washington this week to talking about how to get more people out of cars and onto bikes. And the experts say Seattle is poised to get to the next level.

Seattle is about half way through its ten-year Bicycle Master Plan. An update is under way and expected to be approved by the Seattle City Council this fall.

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